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My Paranormal Life (story 2)

 

After seeing the little boy (Little Blue Eyed Boy) I told you about in my previous story, nothing of great importance happened in our home for years. We would have an item come up missing to later find it where it should have been in the first place. Such as my kitchen colander, serving forks and spoons all of which were bright silver colored.

I often told myself I had just overlooked those things, they were there the whole time. But in the back of my mind I knew. Sometimes denial truly is the best defense.

I need you the reader, to understand this was the first home my husband and I bought together. We wanted it to be a safe haven (so to speak) for our children to grow up in. I didn't want to spoil that by telling them about the little boy or missing items. So I remained quiet and denied, denied, denied...

We bought the house in 1996, at that time it was almost 30 years old. I grew up around here so for the most part I either knew whomever lived in the house or knew of them. I can't remember anything such as a murder, fire or any other tragedy happening here. So, yes, basically I know the history of my home.

I believe the next occurrence happened in the late summer or early fall of 2008. My sister had given my daughter a puppy several years before. We were told he would be a small dog weighing no more than three pounds when fully grown. He ended up weighing around 50 lbs.

Over the next three years he more or less became my dog. I took care of him. He guarded me. I was the only person in the house that could move his food bowl while he was eating and he didn't snap at me. Over time he became more and more vicious. If we had visitors we had to kennel him. There were times he would just walk around and growl at nothing for hours. There wasn't a day that went by that I didn't think of taking him to have him put down. But sometimes our hearts are stupid causing us to make the wrong decisions. Decisions we live to regret.

One night my youngest son, oldest daughter and I were sitting in the living room watching TV. My daughter was actually lying on the sofa. "Dog" came into the room and started his pacing and growling. She called him over and lifted her hand to pet him trying to calm him down. He growled and snapped at her face. He tore her lip so badly she had to have 14 stitches.

My husband (her father) and her husband took her to the ER. While I waited for their return I sat down at my computer. I wasn't having a very easy time dealing with what had happened. I had kept this dog that I knew was dangerous and he had hurt my child. The guilt consumed me.

As I sat there worrying about my daughter, I broke down. I kept thinking what a horrible person I was to put an animal before the safety of my family. Suddenly I felt a hand on my shoulder, it began to softly rub my back. It only lasted for a minute at most. I thought it was my husband, but then realized there was no way they could be back so soon. I turned around to see who it was... No one was there.

The dog was put down the next day. After that day there was so much paranormal activity in our house we considered having a team come in to investigate.

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The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, yomomma, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will read the comments and participate in the discussion.

yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
1 year ago (2016-04-23)
L_Melb - Thanks for reading my story. And thank you for the understanding words. My daughter is doing fine now for a while there she was afraid of most dogs. She did a lot of blaming herself too. She's grown and lives on her own. She has two cats that spend much of their time here. My youngest daughter also has a cat living here. So we're a big animal family (3 cats and 2 dogs). I feel horrible about your brother's dog, I know that must have been devastating to his family. My dogs are a 11 year old Basset Hound and a 6 year old Lab. I've had both since they were puppies. They're my buddies. I also have twin 5 year old grand daughters. If one of my dogs ever acted aggressive towards those little girls, they would be gone in an instant.
L_Melb (194 posts)
+2
2 years ago (2016-04-23)
Wow yomomma, what a frightening and horrible thing to experience - I was reading this while travelling via tram and drew some looks as I couldn't help giving a sharp intake of breath with a hand clapping over my mouth in surprise and horror at reading the attack your daughter sadly suffered.
Apart from the physical injuries, I hope niether she nor anyone else present is having any emotional issues from what happened.
Yes, you had your suspicions before but it would be a rare person who would actively go through with destroying the dog without anything stronger - you're human (i.e. Not perfect but prone to shovel that blame on your own shoulders)
My father, now 82, never allowed us a dog apparently due to a childhood dog "incident" and so I've become a "cat person" but if they were bigger and hungry enough that may have not been my inclination 😜
When required, you acted properly without hesitation - not all dog owners are created equal - some years back one of my brothers had a border collie with a lovely temperament. His neighbours had 2 Rottweilers and a fence he couldn't be brought to fix. The dogs got through and the border collie didn't really stand a chance. Bad enough a lovely family pet was mauled to death, I was anxious for my niece, a toddler at the time, what if she'd been there? Not even an apology was offered by the neighbours for the situation. You're not in the same league - using a lot of words to say damn sorry it happened but don't be too hard on yourself!
All the very best, L
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-22)
notadaddysgirl - Hi, thank you so much for your kind words, I truly appreciate them. I have wondered the same about the chemical imbalance.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-22)
snowflakes211 - Hi, thank you for your comment. I'm not sure I'll ever know what happened with him. But I'm taking everything into consideration. I never thought of it as him being scared.
snowflakes211 (4 stories) (21 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-22)
Hi, I feel there may be a possibility that some malevolent presence triggered your dog's behavior. Maybe it even wanted to encourage you to make the decision to put the dog down. Animals are known to be more sensitive towards paranormal. I have heard of many accounts where a pet has recognized a paranormal presence and stood guard for his owner.
Generally if an animal is being aggressive, he may be ill, in pain or scared. Like my cat sometimes gets his leg stuck in a tree branch and when I try to help him he becomes aggressive and bites me. Just putting this view out there to consider.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+2
2 years ago (2016-04-21)
DandK - I'm truly sorry you have to witness the abuse of the cat and the two dogs. Personally I would probably let the cat out, untie the dogs. Sometimes you just have to keep at it when no one will listen to you. Make all the noise you can and when someone tells you nothing can be done it only means you haven't talked to the right person.

Now I have a question for you. If you were holding an active hand grenade would you (knowing how dangerous it was) just hand it off to the person who was standing next to you or would you try to do the right thing (save someone else from the injury and heartache) and get rid of it yourself.

Once a dog attacks someone, and a report is made, here where I live, they can not be rehomed. (It is unlawful for the owner of the dog or cat or other animal to sell, give away, transfer, transport to another area.) pre Arkansas Animal Laws.

As always I appreciate your comments.
DandK (9 stories) (287 posts)
-2
2 years ago (2016-04-21)
More about those opinions, I'm sorry I can't in good conscience let this go without saying...I'm always amazed at how we, as humans, justify our actions to ourselves.

The people that live in the house behind me (our backyards are adjacent) have a cat. One of the people that lives there (the wife; it is a husband and wife, middle aged, no kids) decided that the cat was too stinky to keep in the house. So she bought a small kennel, large enough for the cat to stand up nicely and move at least a full body length forward, and placed it in the farthest portion of her back yard, away from her house, but just so happens to be right next to the fence between us. So I'm closer to the cat than she is.

Well, the cat doesn't enjoy being in a cage outside, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. And it cries. Constantly. And whines and wimpers. Loudly. It has a small piece of old carpet on the roof of the carrier so that when it is in full afternoon sun, it can squat in a small piece of shade in the corner. It also seems to have a water bowl and has a dry food bowl that looks like it usually has stuff in it.

When I go outside to be in my yard, with my plants and nature, I have to listen to a tortured cat. Every day.

I've investigated this with the Humane Society, and there is nothing that can be done. The cat has food and water and the small carpet for shelter. We have no noise ordinance during the day for pets in the county (I'm not in city limits), so it isn't technically a nuisance. Most people think that it is not cruel. Therefore, this cat gets to spend his life in his backyard cage (To be fair, I have seen them go out and get the cat for a few minutes every couple of weeks or so, but the cat yells even more when put back in his 'home').

My other next door neighbor has two dogs that bark constantly because they don't like being tied to the backyard tree with a rope all day and all night long. These poor guys don't even have shade when they accidentally wrap their rope around the tree too many times so that they are stuck. At those times, they can't even reach their water bowl. They are big dogs (German Shepard sized). They bark continuously when tied to the tree. Fortunately, these folks will take them inside every couple of days and their noise subsides.

But, they have their opinion on how other beings should be treated, and I have mine. And feeling entitled to having our own opinions seems to be our own brand of justification for our acts. And would I be right to impose my feelings and opinions on them? Maybe they are being kinder to the pet than killing them. Since obviously, the pet wouldn't be able to find a new home, right? Maybe the pet would be mean in the new home, because we know what is right and true and nobody else can do better than us at caring for OUR animal, so the only option is: caging, tying up, or killing.

This is the last I will ever say on this topic, and I'm sorry for feeling that I had to take up time and comment space in this story for this, ironically throwing around my opinion while talking about the danger of opinions.
notadaddysgirl (3 stories) (28 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-21)
Hello again yomomma,

So sad that the story ends this way as I love dogs but you did what you had to do.

I am wondering wether dogs, like humans can have chemical embalances in their brains and this caused the anger issues that he faced.

If this is the case I think you may have done your dog a favour just like being physically ill.

Blessed be ❤
DandK (9 stories) (287 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-21)
Tweed, thanks for the documentary reference. I can definitely say I won't watch it. I am powerless to instigate change on the order I wish I could, so I have to limit my battles to the small ones that I can handle. The pain is too unbearable otherwise at this point in time.
DandK (9 stories) (287 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-21)
Yomama, yes, you are right. Everyone has their own opinions. I'm sorry for forcing my thoughts on you. I have found that I'm going through a somewhat intolerant phase in my life and have become less able to shield myself from things that bother me like I used to.

And thanks for the reminder of the feeling you had of someone rubbing your shoulders as the paranormal portion of the story. That happens to me on a daily basis in the form of rubbing my arm or touching my hand or neck and cheek, so I forgot that is unusual for folks.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
Tweed - sorry about not clarifying if I thought it was my father or not. The touch was not threatening. So yes that could have been my father. At the time I didn't jump to the assumption of it being my father, I was a little spooked. Later after things calmed down some, I did take the time to think about it and to me it made sense it was him.
Now the feeling the next day and for days to come was not comforting. It was terrifying. It's very difficult to explain. It was as if something dark had entered my home. Something just lurking.
Miracles51031 (36 stories) (4802 posts) mod
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
DandK - I think feeling someone rub on your back, and no one being there, would be considered paranormal. That is a little different than someone wondering if that rush of air was a ghostly visit.
Tweed (22 stories) (2034 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
Yomomma, I think you have another story posted which I've not read yet, so perhaps my question will be answered after reading that. Anyway, I'm a bit unclear as to if you meant the back rub that you felt was your father, did you fear it wasn't your father who rubbed your back? Or do you mean it was something or someone not so nice rubbing your back?

Like, I said I haven't read your other story yet, but given everything you've said here I'd say it was your father comforting you because of the timing. ❤

DandK, I've never been in the situation Yomomma faced, so I can't say what I would do, but no question I would remove the dog from the home one way or the other. There's a really brilliant journalist named Louis Theroux who makes a bunch of docos, many of them made in America. One of his more recent was on the stray dog crisis in LA. I say 'crisis' because, after watching the doc, it's clear how big and tragic the problem is.
It's not an easy doc to watch, but it demonstrates the human and dog problem from both sides. 😊
He summed it up beautifully by saying:
"Perhaps a dog's flaw is to understand us too little and love us too much" ❤
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
DandK - I knew when writing this story I would be somehow persecuted by at least a few. And that's ok. You have your opinions. I have mine. One of which is that with owning an animal comes great responsibility. Unfortunately, that responsibility includes knowing when to have an animal put down. My guilt comes from letting him live as long as I did and he in turn hurting my daughter. I know I did the right thing by having him put down.

As far as my story not having anything to do with the paranormal, again that is your opinion and I respect that. Thank you for commenting.
rookdygin (24 stories) (4325 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
DandK,

To answer your question:

Once upon a time there was 'mankind' and he was learning how to survive, during the course of 'life lessons' it was discovered that they could co-exist with canines, not only could they co-exist but the relationship was mutually beneficial.

The Canines provided mankind with protection and aided them with hunting and in return received food and shelter.

I think that about sums it up.

As far as the rest goes, from crossbreeding right on through the rest its all based on individuals 'free will'. That does not always make an individuals choice the 'noble' or 'fair decision, just that someone 'made the call' and that call is not always 'easy' to make.

As for a paranormal events in this experience, the ending is pretty telling about 'events' that were happening around the time of the 'bite' as well as afterwards.

Respectfully,

Rook
DandK (9 stories) (287 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-20)
I'm very sorry, but I have to ask why we choose to bring a non human species into our homes and then expect them to live a certain way, or die? Why do we choose who lives or dies based on behavior when it is not a situation in which it's merciful to help a dying creature (human or non) pass in order to avoid inevitable and undesirable suffering? Was there no alternative, such as removing him from the home? Was his behavior due to some irritant in the home (spiritual or otherwise) or in some other way bad for him? Could the situation have been helped if he was removed from the home when it was clear he was changing in a way not conducive to his current living arrangement? Or is death a better alternative? No other, better options?

I don't see anything here that is ghostly or supernatural. I just see this story as an outlet for grieving because, well, who wouldn't grieve and feel a huge amount of guilt for a terrible act? Very sad, and this is how humanity coexist with the wonderful creations we are blessed to be with in this life.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
RCRuskin - thank you for explaining. Malevolent, very interesting.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Manafon1- Thank you. Oh yeah it was a huge surprise when he just kept growing.
My daughter-in-law is a groomer. She too refuses to have anything to do with chows after having one stick his tooth through her hand while she was bathing him.
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Tweed- Thank you. I've often thought it was my father. When one of his children were upset, he would say, I love you and rub us on the back. So it makes sense that it was him. What doesn't make sense is for a long time I had a horrible feeling as if something straight from hell was always near me. My father was a kind person, this thing was not. Perhaps the two had nothing to do with each other.
RCRuskin (6 stories) (231 posts)
-1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
YoMamma,

Ruling out any physical possibilities, we end up with ghosts, whether benign spirits or malevolent demons. Given the nature of events, malevolent seems to me an accurate description.

(Note: I typed 'good' but changed it as there doesn't seem to be much good here.)
Manafon1 (5 stories) (481 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Hi Tweed--Chow's are one of the oldest breeds of dog in existence and were originally native to China, Mongolia and Siberia. Although not generally referred to as snow dogs, they are, it is believed, related to snow dogs like the Samoyed.

The leonberger is classed as a "working dog" (not of the briefcase and suit variety) and are usually great with their owners but are almost always leery of outsiders. They (at least in my experience) easily misinterpret "playing" (running around with it for instance) as aggression and can turn on the unsuspecting person (like I was with one once) and become aggressive and intimidating. I only avoided getting bitten by a leonberger by breaking eye contact, whereupon the dog turned away. They are HUGE dogs. Sorry to digress in the comment section for your story yomomma.
Tweed (22 stories) (2034 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Omg Manafon, wow I knew Chows had a bad reputation but being among two breeds you and your wife won't work with is really saying something! I've never heard of the Leonberger, I just ran a search and they look similar to a breed of hunting dog from a hundred years or so ago which is long since extinct. Apparently that dog (name long escapes me) was particularly dangerous, maybe the Leonberger is related.

Are Chows snow dogs? Their temperament, coat and tail indicate they are but they're never put in the snow dog category. 😕
Manafon1 (5 stories) (481 posts)
+2
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Hi Tweed-- you are completely right about chow's needing a ton of activity to keep them occupied and contented. My wife and I were friends with a couple who bought a chow and then proceeded to keep it locked up in one room in the house. The dog became incredibly, frighteningly aggressive, biting the wife more than once. The neglect of this chow led to it seriously biting the husbands nephew, who like yomamma' daughter, required many stitches. As in yomamma's case, they had to have the dog put down.

Hi yomomma--It really all comes together finding out what type of dog was involved! Chow's and leonberger's are the only dogs my wife and I will not take on, sight unseen, to care for in our business. Too many close calls and frustrated aggression! You definitely made the right decision putting the dog down. Once a chow bites it will continue to bite down the line. To think you had what you thought was a Yorkie only to have it grow into a stocky chow must have been a real surprise! Of course I realize you were not neglecting the dog as my old friends were. Their keeping their chow locked up all the time created a monster. As Tweed wrote, chow's need constant activity or they become restless. This restlessness easily turns to aggression.
Tweed (22 stories) (2034 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Hi Yomomma,

Firstly a big thanks to Manafon for the doggy info. Because so often there are stories here involving dogs to which my first thought is always 'what's the breed?' It makes a huge difference in my opinion.

As your dog had Chow in him I'm sad to say I'm not surprised he eventually lashed out. These are working dogs built and bred to run, run, run and go, go, go for DAYS. All that pacing and growling was likely a result of frustration. All working dogs need an enormous amount of exercise or they go nuts and become aggressive. I'd say your dog would have behaved the same regardless of what ghostly activity was going on. Also working dogs 'nip' as a first 'back off' warning. You made the right decision, don't be hard on yourself. It wasn't an easy decision by any means.

The first thing I thought of with your ghost was possibly a family member? Someone who knew you needed a hug. ❤
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
RCRuskin- thank you for commenting. What's that one option?
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Fergie - Thank you. My daughter would like to think he was protecting her. She loved him very much, as I did. For the most part I think his brain was defective. Before I actually wrote this story out I never thought of his behavior as having anything to do with the paranormal. I did not intend for it to sound that way however after reading it again I can see how someone would think that's what I was getting at.
I have always thought that my emotional state after all that went on may have something to do with the things that happened. To me the hand touching me was the beginning. I'm definitely seeing it in a different light now. (hope I'm making sense)
yomomma (11 stories) (81 posts)
+2
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Manafon1- Thank you for commenting and for the info. My sister bought this dog as a full-blood Yorkie. He was 6 weeks old. She only kept him for about a week before realizing he needed so much more attention than she could give him.

He was very tiny weighing under two pounds. He looked like a Yorkie, perfect coloring.
We immediately made sure to get all of his shots and they were kept up to date. At first our vet didn't comment on whether he thought 'dog' was anything other than a Yorkie. But as the months went by dog's legs started getting long, his body started rapidly growing. His tail became very bushy, he held it up over his back. At a year old he looked very much like a chow only with a sleeker body. His hair went from silky to wirey. By this point our vet was convinced he was part chow, only what the other part was, he could not even guess.

He was a beautiful dog. Very intelligent. From the first day (at seven weeks old) when I said sit, he sat. When I filled his food bowl he would sit and watch me until I gave the command that he could come and eat.

He would get a little snappy early on while he was eating. We could never take him outside without a leash because he would be gone. A few times he got out the door. We would find him blocks away. Most of the time he would be curled up sleeping.

He was very well cared for. I loved him. I love my daughter more.
Manafon1 (5 stories) (481 posts)
+1
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Hi yomamma--I found your account an interesting read. My question is what type of dog did you have? RCRuskin suggests that if distemper or rabies are ruled out there can only be one option (that the dog was a conduit for negative entities). I have run a pet care business with my wife for nearly twenty years and have dealt with countless breeds. Certain breeds can just become more aggressive as they get older.

A perfect example is the shar-pei (no offense to any owners of one). Having taken care of several of these dogs, I can say only one didn't show a heightened aggressiveness as it got older. Most shar-pei breeders will go to great lengths to tell you the "fighting" nature of the breed (they were referred to for years as the Chinese Fighting Dog) has been bred out. This simply isn't true in many cases and the breeder sees the dog as a big payday. My wife and I knew a shar-pei named Coda from when it was six weeks old until it was four years old. We stayed with the dog for long periods and it was a seemingly happy, friendly pup. As it grew older it quickly developed a very aggressive demeanor and would growl viciously at kids as it was being walked and then bit its owner, followed by my wife and went after me within a short period.

Now this was a dog that was never abused, was treated with patience and love, but still, the aggression that it was originally bred for surfaced explosively. I don't know what type of dog you had but it is quite possible its aggression, which resulted in your daughter being badly bitten, had nothing to do with distemper or negative spirits. If your dog was a breed that has a history of being bred to fight or guard property (mastiff, leonberger, pittbull for instance) it is possible it's propensity for aggression was just exerting itself. In this case, you shouldn't feel any guilt about what the dog became. It's terrible that your daughter was bitten so badly but with a dog you consider part of your family it is sometimes hard to see the growing aggression that can consume what otherwise is a "normal" dog. It's something worth considering.
Miracles51031 (36 stories) (4802 posts) mod
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
RCRuskin - before I add my comment, what option are you referring to?
RCRuskin (6 stories) (231 posts)
 
2 years ago (2016-04-19)
Fergie, yours is an interesting hypothesis that I agree, and also disagree, with. That the activity increased after the dog was put down indicates, I think, that the dog was the conduit for the malevolent entities.

It seems the dog went from a more kind disposition to being really mean. If we can rule out diseases such as distemper or rabies, there seems to be only one option.

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