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The Great Samsara

 

My story took place in August 1961 when I wore a younger man's clothes. I was home on leave visiting my mother after basic training in Ft. Knox, Ky. During a sweltering, humidity filled summer night in central Michigan. Mom had recently moved into an old Victorian style home and I was trying without success to catch up on some sleep after a long bus ride back home. I was alone in an upstairs bed room and without an air conditioner sleep was all but impossible. During my third trip to the bathroom I made the trek down the hall without turning on the lights as a bright harvest moon lit up the place as though it was daytime.

Suddenly I saw a woman in a full satin formal dress scaling the stairs slowly, one step after another. I could hear the fabric of her dress swishing as it rubbed against itself with each step she took. I was spell bound. I knew it wasn't my mother, in fact in addition to the 18th century style dress the woman had no resemblance whatsoever to my mom who was taller and more slim. I wasn't afraid because I was immersed in curiosity about what I was seeing in HD living color. It helped that the woman seemed just as curious as to who I was. This is where things got really strange. You know when living people first encounter each other it is almost reflexive to engage each other's eyes. I looked into her eyes and saw only white orbs. She never looked into my eyes rather she stared toward my chest. Not in English, or any other language I could feel that she was scanning my inner self. A few minutes went by and after deducing that we had never met before I could feel her deciding to move on. She began to walk down the stair but disappeared into the wall about half way down.

The next morning my mother turned ashen when I related my encounter. She related that she had been listening to a woman's footsteps on the stair for a few weeks but my sister refused to believe her. She made immediate arrangements to leave the place and as far as I know we never encountered the woman again.

I have often thought about my ghost encounter and as I grow older and nearer to my own spirit destiny I am quite keen to hear of other encounters with spirits. I can usually detect false stories, the ones that sensationalize and attempt only to generate fear and delusion for what purpose I cannot understand. All of mankind is already quite susceptible to existential anxiety why make it worse by attempting to scare others as well as themselves? We will all die someday anyway so keep it real.

I was nearly an agnostic before my ghost encounter. I always tried to explain reports of seeing a ghost by others as a result of some quirk in physics but having seen my very own ghost I am a lot more open minded than before. There is a book called "The Tibetan book of the dead" written by a sacred monk named Padma Sambhava back in the 8th century A.D. According to the Tibetan Buddhists the intermediate, or in between state between dying and death can indeed be quite frightening. So much so that some dying souls separating from their physical bodies become too frightened to leave the bardos (places of transitory psychological states) so they wander, lost in a vast wasteland the Tibetans call "The Great Samsara."

A few years went by until I was wounded in Vietnam and had an NDE (Near Death Experience). All of this proves to my own satisfaction that a conscious stream of awareness goes on after physical death. Without a body, physical pain becomes impossible but the psychological condition is vulnerable to either blissful happiness, or immense psychological suffering. I will save my NDE for another time. Peace and good fortune to all. The Buddhists believe that life itself is one enormous illusion. Like a wave that appears to exist as an individual phenomenon then crests and vanishes back into the vast ocean from which it came we belong to a much larger entity that waxes in life and wanes in death, we were never really separate at all.

Scott

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The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, ScottGrant, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will read the comments and participate in the discussion.

ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-31)
Melda

Thanks Melda

I gave you the watered down version. I don't talk about the actual combat since it is too gruesome. I hope my NDE is somehow useful to you.

SG
Melda (8 stories) (585 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-31)
ScottGrant - Thanks so much for providing that information.

I have always been intrigued by people's experiences regarding NDEs and reading yours was certainly no disappointment! It's not surprising that you did an about turn as far as your belief systems are concerned.

I wish you good luck and success with the writing of your book 😊

Regards, Melda
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-31)
Melda

You are too kind but thank you for the kind words. Actually I have decided to write a book about my experience with near death and am somewhere in the middle of chapter three. Since the information will be publicly available when the work is finished I don't mind sending you a few words about my NDE:

I was an agnostic before my encounter. I always tried to explain sightings by others as a result of some quirk in physics but after meeting my very own ghost I have no choice but to keep an open mind when hearing about the experience of others. The encounter was a life altering experience but an even greater experience awaited me in the Republic of South Vietnam some seven years later. I took advanced irregular warfare training in Ft. Bragg, North Carolina after graduating from the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare School as a young Captain. While leading my men near the Mekong river along the border of Cambodia we were taken under withering machine gunfire in an "L" shaped ambush. I called in airstrikes and artillery before rallying my soldiers for a counter attack. I was severely wounded in my right hip and watched myself bleed out as it wasn't possible to apply a tourniquet. Believing me dead my men put me in a helicopter. Several of my dead soldiers were stacked on top of me but I couldn't move an eyelash.

It felt as if my entire body was on fire, inside and out. I recited the lords' prayer and awaited the final truth about death. The pain completely disappeared. I saw myself rise above my body in the rice paddy as my men placed me on a makeshift litter.
Then in astral fashion I lifted higher and took my place near a beautiful pastoral meadow with a soft but lucid white light and waited. A shadowy blur left my body as the euphoria brought tears to my eyes in thought only. I have often remembered that during my NDE I could feel, but obviously the pain which temporarily left me was no longer a part of a connect with my central nervous system. That connection was re-established after the NDE ended. During my NDE I could see normally and think without obstruction. I didn't breathe during the entire experience which lasted a couple of hours. Instead of seeing with my eyes, I was seeing with my thoughts. It felt as though a heavy mill stone had been lifted from my shoulders. I remember thinking without effort and not having to take a single breath. Waiting to meet God who never appeared was unbearable. I believe this was when I died momentarily. Then as suddenly as it began it ended.
The wonderful blissful euphoria went away and I could feel myself being slammed back into my body. An Italian American Major, a trauma surgeon worked on me all night saving my leg from amputation as well as my life. The significance of my N.D. E.? I didn't need proof that the stream of consciousness goes on but I certainly received a clear image of it that I will never forget. It is clear to me now even years after both experiences that I never stopped being myself throughout my NDE but I did leave the realm of the physical while traveling between my dying body and my psychological self.
Melda (8 stories) (585 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-31)
ScottGrant - When I read your account I knew it just had to lead to a lot of interesting back and forth comments. I have so enjoyed the conversations between you and Manafon.

Now moving away from the main subject just for a minute - I would love to read about your NDE. I know that you did mention it but I also got the impression that it was one of the reasons for your research. Any chance that you just might be prepared to submit it in a bit more detail?

If not, that's fine. Nothing wrong with asking 😊

Regards, Melda
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-30)
Manafon1

So glad you agree. The literature available on the subject of postmortem existence is understandably quite paltry indeed. The dead have far fewer incentives to edify the living than we have for seeking the truth of actualization beyond death. I started out with the pure, perhaps naive purpose of answering ontological questions I still have regarding my own apparition and NDE mainly why I was sent back but now my need of more information is plainly selfish. I mean I was in the bardo Thodol but now my options have narrowed, I'm almost desperate to answer why. I have done nothing to promote world peace, or find a cure for cancer and have not done much to deserve a long life. I was married 4 times. I'm on my 5th which after 12 years seem to be holding in spite of my clinical PTSD. My wife is 35, I am 70 and we have 3 beautiful children. We avoid the public, especially restaurants who render judgement for every possible anachronism they see. My children are precocious. Perhaps in a karmic sense I was sent back to birth and teach them what I have learned? Punishment possibly for my taking to great a swallow of life. My avarice is knowing that I won't live to see them graduate from the university though I would do anything to see them have a better future than me.

ScottGrant
Manafon1 (5 stories) (477 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-30)
ScottGrant--So glad that you read "Apparitions". I completely agree that Tyrrell has narrowed his focus of study to fit his theory. He also focuses exclusively on "telepathic" apparitions and states that if a ghost was standing directly in front of a person, even if that person had the best possible audio and visual equipment they wouldn't be able to capture anything because the apparition is completely telepathic. There is too much evidence that suggests that apparitions, at least on occasion, do indeed inhabit physical space for one to throw all of one's proverbial eggs into one basket. I do believe that there are apparitions that are purely telepathic but there are certainly apparitions that fall far outside that remit.

As I wrote in an earlier comment, Tyrrell creates as many questions as he attempts to tackle. All that said, I do appreciate his reasoned approach. His writings are things that should have been the building blocks for further comprehensive theoretical works in the field. Sadly those have been low on the ground. Andrew Mackenzie and Richard Broughton are two figures who have tried to further the foundational work of guys like Tyrrell.

There is more to understanding the paranormal than science and not incorporating elements of magic (if you catch my meaning) overly formalizes and stearilizes occurrences that can't be neatly placed in a Petrie dish. Still, Tyrrell's ideas show a real attempt to catch a glimpse, in a mirror, of the machinery that operates on "the other side".
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-30)
Manafon1

Just finished reading Tyrrell's "Apparitions". He did an excellent and detailed job of categorizing paranormal events but his proscriptions lack foundation in reality. His sub-title tells you why. "The Classic Study Of Extra Sensory Perception (ESP) in relation To Ghostly Appearances." The suggestion is that you need special sensors to see a ghost. I saw one but I wouldn't want to use my mental powers in Vegas. That these special powers include telepathy in regards to being able to see without normal ocular vision, at times in life and death crisis and at other times with no particular purpose and at random, such as I experienced. In essence I felt Tyrrell captured the 'What' but not the 'Why' of the ability to see and hear ghosts. I need the 'Why'. That is the reason that I tend to pursue the answer with Buddhism, in particular Tibetan Buddhism which uses empirical as well as metaphysical logic to explain the otherwise inexplicable. Tyrrell's case studies were none the less fascinating but only added to the statistical chaos of trying to force square pegs into an affinity of round holes. For example, the fact that my encounter was random and the spirit was a stranger to me suggests that one of us was lost without a sustainable purpose, or a way to be alive again to better find a way out. That wasn't me. One may argue that my decision to be a soldier was not the best decision but I at least knew the way to the bus stop. The person I encountered seemed lost and confused which fits the effect I would expect from someone lost in the Samsara after encountering the Sidpa bardo. Although useful, should a doctor of medicine merely count, and categorize the sick, or should he try to understand their diagnosis in order to heal them? As an Electrical engineer Tyrrell is understandably more adept at understanding the circuits than the electricity that runs through them. Even so, his attempt to inject formality and psychoanalytical science into a subject replete with primal fear earns him my respect.

ScottGrant
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-23)
Twilighttyger

Who am I to question another's motive for writing a story? Mine was to open up about seeing a vivid apparition I have kept to myself for several decades, not to entertain others with fear and one upsmanship. The ghost I met was not violent at least not toward me. If you are sitting on the fence as to whether you believe in ghosts it speaks volumes about the authenticity of your encounter suggesting that it is probably an oft repeated family tale. For people who have experienced a genuine apparition there is no room for doubt. I do not doubt your story about Melody but the manner in which you constructed the event does suggest you may be relating a story told within the family over several decades indirectly. No matter, I appreciate that you shared it with us and feel saddened that a child's precious life was cut short.

ScottGrant
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-20)
Manafon1

A lot to digest here. I am very impressed not only with your own astute perceptions and observations but also the breadth of your familiarity with the leaders of research into this vital area of reality. I do not take death lightly but as with you I do not obsess with the fact that it will occur with, or without, my permission. I remember that during my near death in Vietnam I arrived at a point where dying was far preferable to living. After I left my body there was no physical effort to resist because the pain was gone and my conscious thought stream continued without a need to breathe or struggle for life. To the contrary, my release from the burden of occupying a vulnerable body was enhanced by the euphoria I experienced. When the euphoria ended the emptiness was vast and the fear that it was lost perhaps forever haunts me even now. What a wonderful gift you received to have been consoled by persons who love you more than themselves. That is indescribably precious.

In the dream where I was visited by my brother I awakened feeling and remembering only that he had encouraged me to get past his death and on with my own life. He visited only once and since it was in a dream I naively assumed that it had not really happened outside of my own saddened mind. Now I feel certain that he just wanted to help me say good bye. It didn't work. I don't think I will ever say good bye in a permanent sense. I suppose to summarize I believe the following: Dualism is accurate. There is a conscious thought stream that is infinite and not dependent on a physical body to exist. There is most definitely an interaction with other persons, family, friends, others who become part of the reality of physical life, recorded by our dynamic experience of life. Death is just a doorway from the physical life dimension to the psychological dimension that somehow occasionally allows a strongly affected spirit to cross over and communicate from the great between. The Buddhists believe until we are finally liberated from suffering we are all wandering in the great Samsara/Wasteland. T.S. Elliot alluded to this with his remark: "I can show you fear in a handful of dust." His message was that if the milk man was real then he was not. This is one of the few utterings I have encountered that accept the Buddhist belief that life is an illusion.

I find the Buddhist concepts of karma and reincarnation to go quite far in explaining the immoral unfairness of who suffers and who doesn't. I do not necessarily ascribe to Nietzsche's platform of "Good and Evil" but I do believe that good and evil do exist and not in a relative sense. I believe my conscious stream of thought existence serves as a moral compass in this regard. As with any religion, regardless of how complex and difficult, or shockingly simplistic no religion could survive the dawn if it didn't include a method to transform from mortality to immortality. The appeal of Buddhism is that it already subsumes that we are already immortal, just trapped in untruth and failure until we liberate ourselves, the primary liberation being the discovery that we are not real.

Scott
Manafon1 (5 stories) (477 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-20)
ScottGrant--Like many people, especially when I was younger, I used to truly fear the idea of death. This anxiety was profound. Through my own paranormal experiences that fear has evaporated. I simply do not have it anymore. I don't suggest to know what happens after we die but visitations from deceased loved ones have removed those fears. Death is something that will happen and is part of existence. I will experience it and that is like any other part of existence. Of course it's not something I am eagerly anticipating however! There is no hurry on my part and I feel there is still much I need to do here.

I like what you wrote about those who have experienced an NDE who state they don't fear death because it was such a beautiful experience. The Sidpa bardo which describes, "the degeneration from, just after death, the clearest experiences of reality of which one is spiritually capable, and then proceeding to terrifying hallucinations that arise from the impulses of one's previous unskillful actions", might make some of those folks reconsider.

It's also very true what you wrote about religion--"It doesn't matter that religion may in fact be wrong, make that absurd, because the purpose of religion isn't a struggle to learn the truth, rather it exists to allow us to not have to worry about the unknown." This idea of religion serving as a cushion for the fear of death was noted in the 1889 Census of Hallucinations that was carried out by the Society of Psychical Resarch. Many people questioned for this census (which odd title aside was designed to determine how common it was for people to experience an apparition or other paranormal event) stated emphatically that it is wrong to dwell on death and that eternal bliss awaits those who live a good Christian life. Anything beyond this simple thinking was, for many a Victorian person (and for many today), considered morbid and pointless.

Tyrrell doesn't, sadly, deal with "visitation dreams". I have experienced only one of them myself. My mother visited me in a dream that was anything but a dream quite some time after her death. Colors were vibrant, the sense of touch pronounced when I hugged her and equally pronounced when I felt her arms around me. She was paying me a visit. Of course other writers of psychical literature do discuss visitation dreams in depth. Andrew Mackenzie has. His book "Hauntings And Apparitions", which was put out though the Society of Psychical Research is also highly recommended, as are all of his books.

The ceremony at sea for your brother sounds like it was an incredibly moving event. I am assuming that the dream you had of him after his cremation was a visitation dream? If so, you know how incredibly intense they can be. I woke from my mother's visitation with tears streaming down my face uncontrollably. I can definitely state that wasn't a normal event!
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-20)
Manafon1

Yes I'm quite eager to get some professional insight from Tyrrell. I would be lying to say that I think death is a snap because it really isn't. Many who share their NDE experiences write about how they no longer fear death because it was such a beautiful experience but they apparently haven't read the "Tibetan book of the Dead". Had they done so they might realize that their NDE was only superficial, or else they would have actually died and may have learned something in the Sidpa bardo about the "Wrathful Deities."
I have read a little about the psycho-social underpinnings of ontological fear. How we as humans are effected by the universal anxieties of death, meaninglessness and guilt. Not being able to know for certain what awaits we experience varying degrees of raw anxiety which bleeds tangentially into the anxiety of meaninglessness and eventually into the anxiety of guilt and condemnation. If we cannot determine whether existence continues, why did we exist at all and finally, if we can't associate meaning and purpose for ourselves why, or to whom should we regret anything we do.? Within such a scenario it wouldn't matter what we do because it would be meaningless anyway. Of course the anesthesia that helps us convert raw anxiety and its concomitant helplessness into manageable fear is religion and an elaborate God/Creation answer for each unbearable anxiety. It doesn't matter that religion may in fact be wrong, make that absurd, because the purpose of religion isn't a struggle to learn the truth, rather it exists to allow us not to have to worry about the unknown. I lost a brother who had an irregular heartbeat back in the early 1990's. He was irreplacaeble. I suffer my loss even now. I saw him in a dream a few days after his cremation. He was trying to console me as was his nature. He was a world class yachtsman. I spread his ashes at sea. Sixty Seven racing yachts formed a circle near Santa Barbara's coast as I said his eulogy. It ended with: "The Sea was always a part of John, now John is a part of the Sea." Does Tyrrell discuss dream apparitions? Thanks for taking a look at my books. My NDE shows up in "The Year Of The Rat" a sequel to "East Of Egypt" but most of my writing is not particularly about my own paranormal experience, just action thriller stuff.

Scott
Manafon1 (5 stories) (477 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-20)
Hi ScottGrant--I am very glad you have ordered Tyrrell's book "Apparitions". Tyrrell makes no attempt to figure out why ghosts appear in their previous body image, rather he was interested in examining and putting together a cohesive theory of what makes an apparition an apparition and how they interact with the living. His theory is brilliant and satisfying but of course, and one wouldn't expect anything else, poses new questions and leaves some unanswered.

Like you, I have seen apparitions and have had "visitations" by my parents and a close friend after their deaths. I have also had several other "paranormal" encounters from voices to a spectral dog barking. All of these things prove to me in a way no book or theory could that an ability exists that allows those who have died to visit if they decide to do so. My interest in reading theories on apparitions and psychical phenomena was sparked from experiences I have had that mainstream science calls b.s.

I think Tyrrell's book will merely open up a few new ideas for you. Another member of YGS (RANDYM) is part of a fascinating research group. This research has indeed indicated that reincarnation is what every human goes through many times. If revisiting this realm from that of the spirit realm, the belief is that our last human form will be the one we will be seen in if we are witnessed as an apparition. Hopefully Randy will chime in himself. By the way, the several books you have written look fascinating. I plan on getting a couple at some point. Presently I am writing a novel that takes up much of my free time. As you clearly know from your own writing, such a project is gratifying but very time consuming. Our souls may very well be infinite but our time in our mortal bodies sure isn't 😜.
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-20)
Manafon1

Tyrrell's "Apparition" is on the way. I intend to read it in order to be able to be conversant in the future. Thanks again for sharing. Unlike what many who have never seen a ghost may think, this pursuit is not an "Area 51" fascination with the occult, or with metaphysical speculation. The debate between Rene Descartes and Baruch Spinoza centered on the concept of "Dualism" and "psycho-physical Parallelism" which relies on the belief that a soul travels in tandem within a physical body until the body degrades and expires while the soul goes on forever. My ghost encounter verifies this concept almost entirely. What I do not know but can only believe is that a superior architect is the designer of all that we know about the universe. How, or why individuals are capable of traveling back and forth between the life and spirit dimensions almost at will is beyond my own imagination but I saw it for myself. Humankind is generally oriented toward itself. People who report seeing a UFO for example describe a creature with a head, neck, body, arms, legs etc. Wherein the eyes are shaped like large black tear drops and no mouth. In essence, whether describing a UFO, or a God the images wind up being described as similar to ourselves. What perplexes me is that ghosts appear to still be alive within their previous body image. Is this a quirk? A yet to be explained and understood means of retaining existence from the past, or a projection into the future?

Buddhists describe a unity of the conscious thought stream in such a way that the ego and the belief we have separate character existence is an illusion, that we have a conscious thought stream that is not an individual soul. Pressed to answer questions about this irony, Buddha brushed such complex ponderings aside and merely said that such questions do not contribute to the escape from suffering. Only the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path Of Wisdom can bring about the escape of karma and suffering. (Old Age, Sickness and Death.) I digest my truth slowly and without assignment. I know I clearly saw a ghost as I described and I know from my near death experience that the bardos described 800 years ago by a Tibetan monk who wrote about the white light and the clear light and the precious euphoria were nearly identical to my own. I prefer to take what I have experienced and work patiently toward the final answer.

Scott
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
Mr. Manafone1

Thank you for the book referrals. I have a lot to learn. Very much appreciated.

As I write images of little Charlie Gard float in and out. Unable to swallow, see, or hear, the poor little fella must be in the equivalent of Dantes' 9th circle.

Suffer the little children: " But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven." Matthew 19:14

My point is what death brings is not horrible and wretched, rather it is a release from such suffering. It is tempting to try to look into a spirit's existence after death in order to find a purpose for things we do not fully understand. My lady of the stair no longer belongs to the living. From birth to death everything she saw, heard, touched, or tasted now belongs to a place in time and space that she cannot possess again. Can she visit them? Obviously because I saw her I can answer in the positive YES She Can! But she was dead at the time and I was alive. Our encounter was not normal. Unlike meeting with a live person our interaction was at best tenuous. I could not follow her through the wall. She made herself visible to me for a few brief moments but to join her she would have to leave her death state, or I would have to die. Those are two separate dimensions. If you believe as the Buddhists in reincarnation to leave death one must pass through the bardos and subject yourself to rebirth, yet our paths crossed and I was certainly not reborn because I am still in the life I have had since I was born. Therefore I believe you are correct about my experience being a telepathic event without a purpose I could understand on my own terms. If I could have spoken with her I would have tried to determine if she was in some sort of purgatory, unable, or unwilling to move on. The house was very old. Someday it will be destroyed. Where will she go then?

Scott
Manafon1 (5 stories) (477 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
ScottGrant--Thanks for replying to all the comments concerning your account. You have suggested some fascinating books and revealed some very pertinent information about your NDE.

I wanted to suggest that the apparition you encountered might very well not have been trapped in the house. There seems to be a good amount of evidence that the spirit (or consciousness of the dead) can revisit locations that were of importance to them in life. Maybe you just happened to be in that hallway when the spirit of the woman you witnessed was thinking of ascending the stairs of the house. Since you were exactly where she had decided to visit you were caught up in the "apparitional drama".

The formal dress the apparition was wearing suggests it was an important day she had decided to re-visit and as you also just happened to be there you were, in essence, sucked into the telepathic event. To read a brilliant theory on apparitional events and apparitions in general please check out a book I regularly mention on this site. It's "Apparitions" by G.N.M. Tyrrell. That book is easily found with Tyrrell's equally important work, "Science and Psychical Phenomena", in one volume. Both books are watershed theoretical works that also incorporate cases that are illustrative of various points made throughout the texts. It is easy to find online (amazon always seems to have copies at reasonable prices).

Thanks again for sharing your account and your responses.
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
One last book you guys. For a psycho-social account of why religions are created based on universal needs try a delightful little book by Dr. And renowned Harvard theologian Paul Tillich called "The Courage To Be." It completely opened my eyes about the need for religion and how it allows sanity within an ontological nightmare. It's probably way out of print but believe me the search is worth it.

Scott
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
Msforgetmenott

Thank you so much for your kindness. Yes I am a white haired phenom who is resisting death with an almost juvenile naivete'but then what choice do we have as we dodge the Great Mandala? As far as the Tibetans are concerned I recommend only a book by Sogyal Rinpoche: "The Tibetan book of the Living and Dying." He says it all with a bit more empathy than his colleagues. Meditation is the key. Not in worship of anyone, or anything, but in discovery of yourself. If you are interested in self discovery read Eknath Easwaran in his book titled: "Meditation.
If you are interested in Buddhism try a book by Bhikkhu Bodhi titled "The Eightfold Path Of Wisdom."

Scott
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
Manafon1

I wish I could have communicated with you years ago. I have relived my experience many times over and was for the most part dumbstruck by the experience. When the lady stared at my chest I could feel her thoughts, not in words but pretty much with an intensity that belied both our curiosity about whether we knew each other. I have often wished that I would have used speech to ask her about death and why she seemed anchored in that old house. Why certain of us are allowed to remain instead of move on and whether it was her own will, or whether she had no choice. As for my writing ability I wish my audience agreed with you. I am an author of action thriller books: actionthrillers.net but they are only a part of this story in that I combine my ghost encounter with my NDE a few years later in a book.

Scott
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
SpiritWaiting.

To be perfectly honest I was initially turned completely off by the book: "The Tibetan book of the Dead." I know it's because of the cultural dissonance and death anxieties that account for it but when I began to understand that a Tibetan named Padma Sambhava wrote it in the eighth century but described the "bardos" in perfect detail with a description that matched my own NDE thirteen hundred years later I was aghast. I was wounded in Vietnam by a machine gun bullet through my right hip and groin. Unable to apply a tourniquet I bled out. I could see my soldiers trying to save my life as I floated out of body above them. The pain was horrific, my body on fire when suddenly I sensed an entity rush out of my body. I think this was my conscious thought stream. It felt as if a huge millstone had been lifted from my shoulders. Suddenly the pain disappeared and the blissful euphoria does not avail itself for description in any language. I saw a bright but soft white light as I lay down in a beautiful meadow, waiting with immense anticipation for something, or someone, who never came. My thoughts were perfectly clear and I moved without effort from place to place but not using my legs rather in an astral fashion. My karma wasn't yet ripe. With a fearful foreboding I realized the euphoria was being taken from me. The horrific burning pain returned and I awakened two days later in a recovery room. When I read about the Chonyid bardo and the Chikai and finally the Sidpa bardo where one encounters the "Wrathful Deities" I found the experience quite rattling to say the least. The descriptions of the bardos matched my own NDE almost perfectly. I recommend that instead of the "Tibetan book Of the Dead" you avail yourself of a softer version by a chap named Sogyal Rinpoche a Tibetan monk who has written a much friendlier version called "The Tibetan book of the Living and Dying."
ScottGrant (1 stories) (17 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-18)
Melda,

Thank you for the kind words. You have a precise understanding about what we were, are and will always be. It is tempting however to call a spirit after death an energy, or a spirit but this tends to offer something of an over-simplification. I have never been particularly religious but the logic of Buddhism is far too profound to ignore. Buddhists believe humankind to be trapped within a perpetual/infinite cycle of suffering. As such the goal is of course to purify our changing existence until after countless reincarnations we achieve release from the physical body/ies we have assumed and been forced to abandon. Somewhat like a wave in the ocean that swells, crests and then disappears back into the ocean we form and shape into new identities never remembering much beyond a rare sensation of deja vu. The Buddhists do not believe in gods. Buddha himself is considered an enlightened teacher, not a god creator of heaven and earth. He meditated until able to think so perfectly he achieved separation from the cycle of suffering: (old age, sickness and death) Once released his conscious thought stream had no further need to change as it was already in a state of perfection. Buddhists believe the ego we develop to navigate our way through life is both an illusion and an impediment toward existential progress. Only when we are truly empty can we fill our Conscious Stream of Infinite Existence with truth. Truth is needed to achieve escape from the cycle of suffering. Energy? Only in as much as the energy remains psychological. Even the sun will someday end and the cosmos could shrink, or expand until life as we know it no longer exists as before but a psychological consciousness can exist without the need of a physical state. Brain scans can digitally map the effect of brain waves and emotions but they cannot show you how, or why thoughts exist to begin with. Nor can the detractors tell you what is on the outside of the outside of everything, or indeed detail what exists infinitely smaller than sub-atomic existence.

Scott
spiritwaiting (34 stories) (804 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-16)
ScottGrant,

I am now interested in the Tibetan beliefs. Because of this I am going to do a lot more research.I'm always looking for more things to read and discover.
This was the one new thing I have learned today.

Thank you for sharing
This going into my favs!

Sincerely
Spiritwaiting
Melda (8 stories) (585 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-14)
ScottGrant - I apologise for getting your name wrong in my previous comment. What a stupid thing to do! By the way your account has been added to my faves - it belongs there.

RANDYM and Manafon - The wheel turns. You know what I'm talking about😳

Regards, Melda
Manafon1 (5 stories) (477 posts)
+2
2 months ago (2017-07-14)
Hi ScottGrant--Really enjoyed reading your riveting and beautifully written account of your encounter with an apparition. Many aspects of what you witnessed have been reported with regularity in psychical literature. The sound of rustling fabric, the apparent solidity and so on. What struck me immensely about your description of the apparition was the whiteness of the eyes.

Interestingly, when an apparition of a loved one appears, a son visiting his mother for instance, it is often reported that the eyes are as they were in life. Sometimes the eyes are even reported to be unusually intense and vivid as if attempting to convey a message of love through them.

However, when an apparition of an unknown person is seen, if the eyes are noticed at all, they are often described as "empty", "voids", "blank holes" or white orbs, as you described them. That you sensed the apparition was "scanning your inner self" was particularly interesting. I think this might have been you detecting a telepathic connection between your mind and the mind of the deceased woman. Both of your minds creating the "apparitional drama".

That you noticed such minute detail is fantastic. It is too bad that many people are so stunned from an encounter with an apparition that details are missed. Thanks for sharing your striking account and welcome to YGS.
msforgetmenott (8 stories) (132 posts)
+1
2 months ago (2017-07-14)
Hello Scott, welcome to YGS!
It was so enjoyable to read a well written and informative event. Your perspective is not often mentioned here and I would like to know more about Tibetan information on life after death. It is not an area I have studied.
I do not often respond, as generally I am only a reader. We share the same description, (senior adult) and possibly we share other things as well.
I am looking forward to more of your experiences. The way you write is refreshing. I, like yourself, can usually tell the difference between real and fabricated.
Jan
Melda (8 stories) (585 posts)
 
2 months ago (2017-07-14)
GrantScott - To quote some of the members here who have done a lot of research into the paranormal, a ghost is simply a human who has shed its bodily shell but the energy and spirit still live on.

I have adopted that rather obvious explanation. It takes away some of that scary feeling, doesn't it? It certainly makes a lot of sense to me.

I'm really looking forward to reading an exchange of ideas here in reaction to your post...

I enjoyed your account - very well written and welcome to YGS.

Regards, Melda

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