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Incubus And Sleep Paralysis

 

I have never posted stories on a site before pertaining to this, but I was researching sleep paralysis and came across incubus. I believe I have experienced both of these. I thought that it might be a good idea to post my experiences for any feedback as to what readers thought of them both.

Sleep Paralysis - first experience (only experience), two weeks ago, age 28.

I was sleeping in my bed one night. My kids tend to sleep with me since the separation of their father and me. Anyway, I was having a lucid dream. I was being pinned to my bed and my arm was hanging over and something under my bed was pulling it. To me it was a crazy nightmare. I woke up. At least I thought. My eyes were open and I was looking at my son. But, I couldn't move. My whole body was tingling and I had this horrible feeling that someone was doing that to me. I was lying on my stomach and I could only look toward my son. He morphed into someone different. It looked like his father but it was evil. His eyes looked different...dark. This threw me into a panic attack because I knew I was awake. And for 5 minutes I had to lay there paralyzed enduring this. I was screaming my name in this so called dream state but couldn't hear it physically. I was trying to wake my mind and body up. On the 3rd scream of my name I heard it not just in my dream but really out loud. My body came to after that and I went to my couch to sleep because I was so disturbed.

Incubus? - First experience (only experience) 11 or 12 years ago, age 16 or 17.

When I was about 16 or 17 I would wake up and see a figure of a man standing next to my bed watching me as I slept. It was really frightening. I would always run to my brother's room and sleep when this happened. My dog always slept with me. One night, something spooked my dog. She kept growling toward the side of my bed I always saw the man on. I had my light on so I found it a bit eerie. About the fifth time she growled her head slammed into my bed as though someone shoved her down. Her whole body was shaking. It only lasted a minute or so. She shook her head and she left my water bed. I was fully awake for this because I had just laid down. I laid there for a minute calling her back. Then my waterbed moved as someone crawled on the end. I could see the imprints of knees but not the person. It moved up and startled me at my thighs. I could see my pillow next to my head move and I turned too looked. A large hand print formed in the pillow. I felt cold breath on my face like they purposely blew on me. I was able to turn my head but the rest of me was paralyzed. When I screamed for my mom nothing came out. I tried screaming for about 4 minutes. And this thing or entity stayed on me. It was as though they were pinning me down. Then it disappeared the same way it came. The hand print lifted and the knee imprints moved slowly to the end of my bed and off. From that day forward my dog never slept in my room again.

Now when I read about sleep paralysis and incubus. I feel that these are two completely different things. The first story had to be sleep paralysis, but the second story I am assuming is an incubus. The only difference between my story and others is I don't remember feeling as though it had sex with me. Unless I blocked that morbid part out. I just remember the startling and cold breath on my face and the events that led to that. Thinking about the hand print now sends chills up my back. Any opinions?

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The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, Mngirl81, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will participate in the discussion and I need help with what I have experienced.

DraconSable (1 posts)
 
5 years ago (2012-09-25)
Thank you for sharing your story with us.
It must have been petrifying, I know the feeling. I'm unsure if there's any sure, foolproof explanation to what you've experienced, but what caught my eye was the shadow man at the edge of your bed, and that another commenter said that they'd experienced the same thing.

Now, you've said that you'd run to your brother's room when that happened. But the moment you'd actually see him? Could you move?
In some cases of Sleep Paralysis, the person is subject to hallucinations, and one of the most common hallucinations is a dark figure for some reason. 😕
nosuchthing (15 posts)
 
7 years ago (2010-09-10)
Sleep Paralysis
Have you ever felt like you were awake but unable to move? You might have even felt afraid but could not call for help? This condition is called sleep paralysis. Sleep paralysis may leave you feeling frightened, especially if you also see or hear things that aren't really there. Sleep paralysis may happen only once, or you may have it frequently -- even several times a night.

The good news: sleep paralysis is not considered a dangerous health problem. Read on to find out more about sleep paralysis, its possible causes, and its treatment.

Is Sleep Paralysis a Symptom of a Serious Problem?
Sleep researchers conclude that, in most cases, sleep paralysis is simply a sign that your body is not moving smoothly through the stages of sleep. Rarely is sleep paralysis linked to deep underlying psychiatric problems.

Over the centuries, symptoms of sleep paralysis have been described in many ways and often attributed to an "evil" presence: unseen night demons in ancient times, the old hag in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, and alien abductors. Almost every culture throughout history has had stories of shadowy evil creatures that terrify helpless humans at night. People have long sought explanations for this mysterious sleep-time paralysis and the accompanying feelings of terror.







What Is Sleep Paralysis?
Sleep paralysis is a feeling of being conscious but unable to move. It occurs when a person passes between stages of wakefulness and sleep. During these transitions, you may be unable to move or speak for a few seconds up to a few minutes. Some people may also feel pressure or a sense of choking. Sleep paralysis may accompany other sleep disorders such as narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is an overpowering need to sleep caused by a problem with the brain's ability to regulate sleep.

When Does Sleep Paralysis Usually Occur?
Sleep paralysis usually occurs at one of two times. If it occurs while you are falling asleep, it's called hypnagogic or predormital sleep paralysis. If it happens as you are waking up, it's called hypnopompic or postdormital sleep paralysis.

What Happens With Hypnagogic Sleep Paralysis?
As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes. Usually you become less aware, so you do not notice the change. However, if you remain or become aware while falling asleep, you may notice that you cannot move or speak.

What Happens With Hypnopompic Sleep Paralysis?
During sleep, your body alternates between REM (rapid eye movement) and NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. One cycle of REM and NREM sleep lasts about 90 minutes. NREM sleep occurs first and takes up to 75% of your overall sleep time. During NREM sleep, your body relaxes and restores itself. At the end of NREM, your sleep shifts to REM. Your eyes move quickly and dreams occur, but the rest of your body remains very relaxed. Your muscles are "turned off" during REM sleep. If you become aware before the REM cycle has finished, you may notice that you cannot move or speak.
Sleep Paralysis
(continued)
Who Develops Sleep Paralysis?
Up to as many as four out of every 10 people may have sleep paralysis. This common condition is often first noticed in the teen years. But men and women of any age can have it. Sleep paralysis may run in families. Other factors that may be linked to sleep paralysis include:

A lack of sleep
A sleep schedule that changes
Mental conditions such as stress or bipolar disorder
Sleeping on the back
Other sleep problems such as narcolepsy or nighttime leg cramps
Use of certain medications
Substance abuse


How Is Sleep Paralysis Diagnosed?
If you find yourself unable to move or speak for a few seconds or minutes when falling asleep or waking up, then it is likely you have isolated recurrent sleep paralysis. Often there is no need to treat this condition. However, check with your doctor if you have any of these concerns:

You feel anxious about your symptoms
Your symptoms leave you very tired during the day
Your symptoms keep you up during the night
Your doctor may want to gather more information about your sleep health by doing any of these things:

Ask you to describe your symptoms and keep a sleep diary for a few weeks
Discuss your health history, including any known sleep disorders or any family history of sleep disorders
Refer you to a sleep specialist for further evaluation
Conduct overnight sleep studies or daytime nap studies to make sure you do not have another sleep disorder
How Is Sleep Paralysis Treated?
Most people need no treatment for sleep paralysis. Treating any underlying conditions such as narcolepsy may help if you are anxious or unable to sleep well. These treatments may include the following:

Improving sleep habits -- such as making sure you get six to eight hours of sleep each night
Using antidepressant medication to help regulate sleep cycles
Treating any mental health problems that may contribute to sleep paralysis
Treating any other sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy or leg cramps
What Can I Do About Sleep Paralysis?
There's no need to fear nighttime demons or alien abductors. If you have occasional sleep paralysis, you can take steps at home to control this disorder. Start by making sure you get enough sleep. Do what you can to relieve stress in your life -- especially just before bedtime. Try new sleeping positions if you sleep on your back. And be sure to see your doctor if sleep paralysis routinely prevents you from getting a good night's sleep.
xavenging_angelx (5 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-04-04)
I actually get this too, and I always see this really tall, male-shaped shadow standing next to my bed. I cannot move! And I can't scream no matter how hard I try. I've tried to convince myself it is sleep paralysis, but it just isn't...it's different from that. The scariest thing that happened to me was that my sheets were pulled towards the sides of my bed and down, so I was pinned. What is this thing?!
zzsgranny (18 stories) (3312 posts) mod
 
8 years ago (2010-03-23)
Mngirl: I totally understand your reluctance to accept "sleep paralysis" as a scientific explanation to what otherwise could be thought of as paranormal... I too, was very reluctant... But after some research, and a lot of brainstorming, I came to the conclusion that all it is, is the opposite of sleep WALKING... Which is a much more common and therefore easily accepted form of sleep "malfunction" so to speak...

I hope that you don't think that I'm trying to dispute your story, just giving you something to think about... ❤
PuzzledPanther (4 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-23)
Personally, I think that there is a direct link between sleep paralysis and OBE's (out of body experiences). I don't know if you've heard of Robert Monroe? Anyhow, if you haven't check out his books, he explains in depth a lot of what might be interaction with inner dimensional beings, and even a link between observing and even feeling your own body in bed with you as you ascend into what he calls "the second body", which is one of many astral states. He described an incident in which he felt a distinct presence in bed with him, he could feel the body and even facial hair rubbing against his astral body. After a few experiments he was able to determine it was actually his sleeping physical body, not some foreboding entity. Anyhow, I wish you the best and I hope some of what I've talked about helps in some way =)
DeviousAngel (11 stories) (1910 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-22)
Thank you for sharing your story. That would have startled the living daylights out of me too, and I would have been VERY angry, as I do not appreciate anything (living or otherwise) harming animals. Your poor doggy was just trying to protect you from whatever this was! Honestly, I do not think it was an incubus because they don't feed off of fear; they feed off sexual energy. Simply leaning over you won't produce that. I think this was some kind of evil entity of sorts. The fact that it was able to physically manifest points to a particularly strong spirit, so it might be a good idea (if it ever happens again) to do a cleansing/smudging or to follow any of the other advice people might give you that FEELS right to you for dispelling negative entities.

Best of luck!
llaw (1 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-21)
I had sleep paralysis from early childhood until my thirties. I began to search within myself for answers. I personally decided to cover that concern in my nightly prayers because my belief is strong. I continued to have these episodes, but I began to be able to detect when it was going to happen before it happened. I would actually feel that numbing start up all over me as I got into bed. I would talk to someone or get up and try to move around a bit. After that, I went to bed with no problems. I also trained myself to not fight it when it was happening. The only thing I would do is pray in my sleep. Every time, I have been immediately released from the episode. Hope this helps someone.
aussiedaz (18 stories) (1276 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-20)
My personal advise is to firstly convince your self this is a medical condition, what I'd offered to nyral, was to mantra 10 times a day a positive suggestion that will counter act this condition, you can make note of what he repeated, he then went on the charge to tell others his success with positive suggestion, good luck keep me posted.
aussiedaz (18 stories) (1276 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-20)
I believe it is a sub conscious suggestion perhaps triggered by the levels of iron in our blood supply and if you are the type of person that has nightmares generally, that also would contributes to this condition, so I don't believe you always have to experience sleep paralysis, when having a normal nightmare, one other thing read up on another story on my account under nrylayphoisa (I think that's the spelling) read all the advise given to him and his response to them... This man had some real success in over coming sleep paralysis.
Mngirl81 (1 stories) (1 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-20)
aussiedaz,

Thank you for the advise. Fruity funk's stories seemed a lot like my experience. I feel I can relate to them.

I read about whitebuffalo's thoughts on sleep paralysis and how it is from waking up too quickly from REM sleep. This is what I found in my first research on sleep paralysis. I can agree with this and I do, but one question weighs on my mind. If it is from quickly waking up from a REM state, then why doesn't it happen all the time when awaking immediately from a dream or nightmare. I have had numerous times where I wake from nightmares and this has never happend? Also, it took about 4 or 5 minutes for my body to be functional. If it takes that amount of time to wear off why wouldn't everyone feel the affects of this chemical that is released during REM when waking up in the middle of any dream? I mean, don't we only dream during our REM stage? And during REM is the only time this chemical is produced.

Also, just another note. I figured I would post the story about incubus because it came across in my readings about sleep paralysis. This happened a long time ago and I am not bothered by it. But, I thought it note worthy because they are 2 completely different situations and it seems that people will confuse the two. Really, I don't even know if that second one was an incubus. But I do firmly believe someone was there on top of me. I had not even gone to bed yet, nor shut my eyes for that matter. So I can't put it in a sleep disturbance category.

Thank you again for the advice!
ONLY1LADYRAIN (1 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-20)
I HAVE HAD LOTS OF PARALYSIS, EVER SINCE I WAS A VERY LITTLE GIRL AND EVERYTIME IT'S VERY SCARY, EXSPECIALLY WHEN I CAN, T BREATH, OR I KNOW I AM AWAKE. YOU ARE NOT ALONE. ❤
aussiedaz (18 stories) (1276 posts)
 
8 years ago (2010-03-19)
In regards to sleep paralysis, if you click on my account name, read up on a lass name fruity funk, I want you to read the advise of whitebuffalo (seeker) her advise is solid and sound, in regards to the incubus, that was a long time ago, I would be trying to forget that if I were you, this story is setting up for an invasion of
Demon fanatics, "be warned" wish you all the best and I can understand how frightening your experiences are for you,

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