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Soviet Sanitarium

 

Moving into our new downtown high rise flat was a serious pain, seriously... It took over a month from the time we purchased the apartment, to when we could even start moving our belongings in. Then, we had to wait several more weeks for specific fixtures to arrive and get installed. The city was obviously experiencing a boom from new trade with China and Japan, and the housing growth was far exceeding the city's construction industry's capacity. The winter had been particularly cold as well, and although we were now in March, there was no sign the freezing temperatures and snow intended to abate. Babushka had also fallen ill with a particularly nasty bug and even more nasty cure, which of course - thanks to her superstitious upbringing, meant she had to try all manner of strange, horrible smelling salves and potions. Ludya took a small break from work to stay with her grandmother and help her during recovery. The memory of what I saw in her bedroom over the New Year holidays never fully left the back of my mind however. Every time I'd make my way into her room, to say hello or bring her a bowl of soup, I'd expect some presence to be felt, or some object to move. I refused to be left alone in that house again.

Once the stress of the move had abated and we were successfully moved into our new home, work began to take on a much more structured and orderly pace, and our lives at last started to stabilize - it was time for my girlfriend and I to begin our adventure together. The first places we wanted to see, were some of the former soviet republics which could be found along the country's southern and western borders. Nations which, although freed in the early 1990's never seemed to thrive in the same way that Russia proper had. Once the winter's icy grip had finally started to thaw, around late May we flew from Vladivostok to Chelyabinsk, far away in the Caucasus and from there rented a car to drive to the border with Kazakhstan. The road was in excellent condition as this was obviously a vital trade route, and we purred along nicely in our rented "Chevy Cruze"... Honestly I probably would have preferred a good old soviet era Lada to get more of the experience, but for whatever reason - none were to be had... At the border, we got quite a few stares from the security patrols and border police on both sides. It was obvious that very few "tourists" or even European Russians passed through this crossing. The region was populated almost entirely with native Tatar, Kazakh and Bashkir people. Not withstanding the curious questions an

D glances, a few passport scans and a check for fruits/veg, and we were on our way south again - now in Kazakhstan!

The first stop on our journey was to an abandoned Sanitarium. Now, when you hear that term Sanitarium, you most likely think of a privately run "asylum" or perhaps a place where people with chronic illness would go to hopefully, recover. However, in Europe and these Eurasian countries, they often had a very different use. They were simply locations where local citizens could go on a short vacation. Escape from the stresses of the major industrial cities like Chelyabinsk or Omsk and relax. They usually included a lot of steam rooms, pools, tennis courts, and maybe a small football pitch. They were paid for by the workers' government-backed jobs, or were simply free in many cases and were considered an essential part of a person's work year. With the fall of the Soviet Union, most of these places weren't bought up by private companies and the government in most of these ex-satellite nations couldn't afford to maintain them. They were allowed to rot, and in some cases, were filled with refugees from one post-soviet war or another...

This Sanitarium, it appeared, was simply allowed to die a slow death. The grounds were "secured" though in typical style, that really only meant a chain and padlock. Both of which were long gone by the time we arrived. The white stucco façade in traditional soviet Romanesque design was broken and scarred, with large cracks exposing the concrete and rebar skeleton within. Virtually every window had been broken out, most likely by area kids who had also taken it upon themselves to cover every inch of the interior walls with graffiti. The building had obviously been vandalized as well, following the fall, as most of the ornamental hammer and sickle emblems had been intentionally chiseled off the walls, and we'd come across the occasional bust of Stalin or Lenin, with the face broken away.

Moving down into the lower levels we came across the great theater, massive and paneled in false marble, the auditorium could probably have fit at least 2,000 people in its heyday, now silent and crumbling. Long, tattered, mold covered velvet curtains hung precariously on either side of the performance stage. The stage its self, had more broken than intact boards, and several of the heavy projector lights had fallen from their perches in the rigging above, to puncture through the mossy stage like cannon ball scars. Just to the right of the stage, stood a tall, multi-paneled window which as with the others in the building was entirely devoid of glass. As the faint sunlight filtered through, forming long rays in the swirling dust and mold spores my girlfriend spotted what appeared to be an outline of a man standing just to the side of the window frame. Tapping me on the shoulder, I turned to look at where she was motioning and caught a glimpse of the man myself. Calling up to him in Russian, we tried to get his attention (thinking at the time he was simply a local exploring).

"Privet," (hey) I called up to the form... With no answer I called up again, more formally this time.

"Dobri den!" (Good day). Still there was no reply.

For a moment, we wondered if this was perhaps a security guard, and that we were trespassing. The figure was rather clear in his position just beside the window, standing outside and looking down at us from perhaps 12 meters up the wall. Asking my girlfriend to wait there a moment, I stepped back through the entrance of the theater and made my way quickly around the corner of the building, to the exterior wall adjacent to where the window stood. Pulling my mobile phone from my pocket, along with my passport (in case it was security) I quickly made my way up to the point where the man was standing... I stopped in my tracks as I found sheer wall. No place for a man, or anything to be standing at the exterior of the building outside that window. No balcony, or bridge, or walkway. Not only was there nowhere to stand, but there was no man there... Tapping my girlfriend's number into my phone, I placed the call and waited anxiously while it rang...

"Hello?" She answered softly.

"Is the man still standing there?" I asked, trying not to give away the surprise and adrenaline in my voice...

"Yes, he's still standing there, staring at me." She replied.

I quickly explained that he could not be standing there, and why, the explanation causing her to ask me to stop and slow down several times. When it finally dawned on her what I was saying, she cursed softly into the phone and took off running toward the entrance. I also took off, closing the gap between us quickly as I could. When I saw her there, emerging from the grand theater's gaping entrance, she was pale and shivering. We grabbed each other and both made our way back around to the exterior wall. We both knew what we'd find when we arrived, but something in our minds made us NEED to verify it to ourselves. As expected, there was only a sheer wall, a broken window, and no man there waiting when we reached the spot again. We discussed what had happened at length, verifying with each other that we had indeed both seen what we had thought we had seen. When we were both convinced that neither of us were insane - we pressed on, back toward the larger of the buildings on the old Sanitarium campus.

This building had obviously been the old administrative wing. It contained staff housing, offices, meeting space, and a lot of what looked to be rather official documents scattered all over the floor of several of the first floor rooms. The doors had been completely removed from the hinges and taken, probably made from a valuable metal or containing ornate carvings. It was a prize too valuable to leave behind, and as was often the case with these abandoned structures, the treasures were immediately looted in the early 90s.

One of the massive filing rooms, contained what had to be 400 individual filing cabinets, lining both sides of a massive rectangular room. Between the rows of cabinets, sat a dozen long tables with piles of old documents scattered all over. The roof had long failed, causing rain and snow to penetrate the room, and turn these papers to mush, mixed with mold and grasses struggling to grow in a random scattering of penetrating sunbeams. Upon entering this room, both of us had an intense feeling of unease. There was definitely the sense that someone was watching us, though we were obviously the only two people in the room. Using our high powered LED flashlights, we scoured every nook and cranny of the room, and the only people there were the two of us. The deeper into the records room, the harsher the sensation felt, until it was almost one of resentment and even loathing. Calling out to the unseen energy, I tried to determine what it was, and what it wanted...

Again, in Russian I spoke out... "Privet..." I called out loudly...

"Kho ti?" (Who are you?)

"Vy khotite, chtoby my ushli?" (Do you want us gone?)

We stood there in silence as my questions echoed through the room, our flashlights cutting beams of white light through the dark angular space... Suddenly, with no warning, we noticed movement at the far end of the room. A large portrait of what looked to be a soviet official detached from its mount at the top of the frame, swung forward, and crashed down on a stack of rolling desk chairs which were piled on the floor just in front of it. The force of the crash sent several of the chairs careening off in different directions, and the rotten frame and canvas of the portrait cracked into several pieces, filling the room with an ear shattering crash and the squeaking of the rusted chair wheels... Sufficed to say, that was enough of an experience for the both of us, and we quickly and "efficiently" made our way back to the rental car. A couple of minutes later we were back on the road to Kostanay where we would stay for the night. I would say sleep, but neither of us got much sleep that night.

Other hauntings by Dreyk

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Comments about this paranormal experience

The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, Dreyk, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will read the comments and participate in the discussion.

InTheNight (1 stories) (11 posts)
 
3 months ago (2021-06-19)
Was the man also standing there when you were running away, or had he dissappeared?
Sleeping-with-steve (8 stories) (529 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2021-04-02)
LFrog1386,

Yeah, I read it too. You weren't imaging it. It was funny eh? 🀣

Best wishes,
SWS 😘
LightMight (4 stories) (128 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2021-04-01)
Very Silly - Happy April Fool's Day 😁 This is happening in other comments too.
lady-glow (13 stories) (2836 posts)
+3
6 months ago (2021-04-01)
LFrog.

Think a little... The site is h a u n t e d today by a funny spi-rit... It will be back in normal soon.
LFrog1386 (1 stories) (65 posts)
 
6 months ago (2021-04-01)
SWS its so bizarre! Even worse, the words I am saying are being changed from what I've typed. Are you seeing the same things I am in the comments? Or is it just me? 🀣
Sleeping-with-steve (8 stories) (529 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2021-04-01)
LFrog1386
I'm in stitches reading your comment. Purple pants, clown and red nose are words that replace random words on special occasions. A bit of light humour and I'm loving it.

Best wishes,
SWS. 🀣🀑
LFrog1386 (1 stories) (65 posts)
 
6 months ago (2021-04-01)
I think I might be losing my mind. The word clown is interjected over other words here repeatedly throughout the comments section. Mrs. Ramsay greets you as
Great Clown and talks about you and your clown friend when clearly it should mean girlfriend.
Posts from the author himself have the word clown interjected where I believe the word Spirit should be. Am I going crazy? Am I the only one seeing this?
Oh great when I went to edit this the word cloud becomes purple pants. I wonder what purple pants will become?
Dreyk (9 stories) (27 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2021-03-11)
[at] Macknorton

The "darkness" of Siberia is not so much that scores of people died within the region. It's that entire communities ended there. I see you mention Stalin. He did have a particular love of exiling people to Siberia, but he wasn't the first and certainly wasn't the most prevalent deporter. The Russian Tzars, for hundreds of years shipped "undesirables" east by the thousands. In the case of the Caucasus, they would pack up entire indigenous populations and whole villages of recently conquered regions and ship them to Siberia as labor and to populate the east. Many of these people weren't allowed to return to their homelands until Khrushchev came to power (in some cases few were left).

There are certainly other very "spiritually charged" places in the world where people gather to share paranormal experiences. I'm not saying Siberia has the exclusive rights to that title, but it's certainly one of those regions. Also remember, this region (as with most of the Far East) is deeply superstitious and steeped in paranormal traditions. You may not believe that spirits of victims of violent, or particularly horrible deaths return to the location of their death - but most of the cultures of this part of the world do. According to Japanese Shintoism, the sprits of victims of a violent death "become a stain upon the place." Chinese, Mongolian, and of course the Tatar people of the region have similar beliefs.

Lastly, I think there may have been some confusion. I am not claiming I have ANY psychic abilities. I do not. What I was saying, was that there are regions in Siberia where there is so much paranormal activity, one does not *have* to be a psychic to experience things. As it's called in Russian... Tyazhelprivideniyami "Ghost heavy"...
Macknorton (5 stories) (646 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2021-03-01)
Hi Dreyk

Thanks for taking the time to respond with these details. You have "fleshed out" a lot for me.

This following discussion / thread may go on a bit of a tangent, but to me, it's interesting as it's often a topic that many people tend to not agree on, so makes for good discussions & sharing of ideas and theories.

In terms of "overwhelmingly spiritually charged" areas, you put forward a theory around "the particularly high amount of death and suffering which occurred in the region (Siberia) through the centuries compared to other places in the world. If you look at some of the most "haunted" places in the world, they tend to be the site of some major trauma. Take that trauma, multiply it by 100, 000 and you're getting close to what Siberia has seen..."

I suppose one could put forward the argument that just because a human being experiences a violent death, or has suffered, that does not mean that they will automatically be drawn back to the place of their suffering / death to haunt / materialize to flesh and blood humans. Taking that logic further, one could then look at where humanity has sprung from and been present on Earth. Africa is considered to be the birthplace of humans, who then spread into Europe and then across Russia. One could argue that Africa, with it's immense and blood-filled human history, should be a veritable constant light show of spirits / ghost etc.

Personally I've never understood the whole "haunted graveyard" thing - to me, once the soul / consciousness has left the body, why return to what is essentially now a decomposing old coat that you no longer require? Plus, generally speaking, a graveyard is not the scene of the death / suffering of the passed individual.

Through personal experience I believe that events, both good and bad, can be somehow "recorded" in the ether and some sensitive souls, in certain conditions, can pick up on these feelings. But that's different to full blown manifestations of spirits that can be seen by multiple witnesses.

Stalin was "responsible" for far more murders than Hitler, but that's not a well known fact. So yes, there has been immense death and suffering in Russia, but one could argue that Europe itself (and Africa) has seen a tremendous amount of death and suffering also, not only through war but also disease, plague and pestilence.

My final point is that I do honestly struggle to understand how you went from no psychic abilities to suddenly having a lot because you simply shifted your physical location. In my opinion the spirit world is all around us, and therefore it shouldn't make any difference where you are; you either have the ability to sense, see, communicate with spirits to a certain degree, or you don't. I believe that for the most part spirits consciously and deliberately reveal themselves to us for their own reasons, no matter what happened to them, or where. That's merely my opinion. After all, what do I know, right? 😊

I hope I'm not coming across as argumentative, that's not my desire; rather your vivid experience and subsequent comments have got my mind stimulated, which is great!

I hope that through discussion, we can all learn more about what lies beyond "the veil" and try to better understand our often fleeting interactions with that world.

Peace,

Mack
Dreyk (9 stories) (27 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-03-01)
[at] Macknorton

Wow, a lot to cover. Happy to flesh things out a bit. The purpose of our visit was to visit and explore abandoned locations in former soviet nations. It's part of our wider interest in Urban Exploration or Urbex... YouTube it... You'll find millions of people around the world do the same thing, most in locations in FAR worse structural condition than we were in this instance. The purpose is to make a connection to the past in a much more physical and tangible way than one can do from reading about a place in a history book. There's also a significant paranormal investigation draw, though that was not the primary purpose of our visit there.

The region I was referring to as being "overwhelmingly spiritually charged" was actually Sibera, which is the location of most of my stories up to this point. Mostly it refers to the particularly high amount of death and suffering which occurred in the region through the centuries compared to other places in the world. If you look at some of the most "haunted" places in the world, they tend to be the site of some major trauma. Take that trauma, multiply it by 100, 000 and you're getting close to what Siberia has seen. Kazakhstan too has seen its share of death and suffering in relatively large scale. Haunted locations in the US generally can't compare if for nothing else than their relatively short existence as a well-populated area.

I've crossed through MANY border crossings between the Russian Federation and neighboring countries. It's pretty obvious which ones are popular for land crossing by tourists (typically bicycles and back packers coming in from Western/Eastern Europe). The Industrial city of Chelyabinsk to Kazakhstan is NOT one of them. Chelyabinsk, although large, is not particularly popular with foreign visitors. Russians and foreigners will generally fly from location to location due to road condition and often (false) rumors about police corruption and bribe attempts. Foreign tourists also don't tend to speak Russian on their visits. Russian is necessary to complete a border crossing here, they do not have English speaking staff. I'd say, from the traffic we observed while waiting at the check points, the bulk of travel on this particular crossing was freight. All of this doesn't even cover the difficulty of visiting from another country, to enter Russia, then travel to another state. It's hard enough to get a foreign visitor's visa to enter... To get one just for a couple days, then to cross into another country, and try to come back... Talk about red tape.

There may have been an increase in tourism to the major cities in Kazakhstan following Borat, but that really has nothing to do with tourist travel in the provinces, which is virtually non existent and has no infrastructure to support it.

As for leaving the documents behind. Sure, the Soviet Union was notorious for secrecy... Sort of... Oppressive? Also, sort of... These are records regarding a holiday resort, not a weapons lab. Also, the Soviet Union was over. With the fall, went all that infrastructure and organization. The ethnic Russians living in the area who were overseeing administration were given a few days to pack and leave. Not to mention the chaos of them trying to return to their own homelands throughout the former Soviet Union as things were collapsing around them. Lots of documents were simply left, the documents, the equipment, anything that wouldn't fit into a briefcase. We've found abandoned documents in various buildings we visited in the former USSR. We found piles of abandoned documents in abandoned buildings in the USA as well. When exploring the California State Asylum compound (before it was demolished) we found hundreds of abandoned patient records.

Large metal items are stolen for scrap. It takes a LOT of iron to turn any kind of profit. A stairwell, a catwalk, the window frames for an entire floor of a building? Absolutely. Some filing cabinets? Nope. Lamps? Nope. I'm sure a ton of things were taken as souvenirs over the years, but a government institution like that would have had bulk of everything. Again, search for Urban Exploration on YouTube. The stuff left behind in these old buildings are insane, no matter what country you're in.

I didn't plan on writing a tourism guide for the former USSR, LOL. I hope this answered things. If not, let me know!
Macknorton (5 stories) (646 posts)
+3
7 months ago (2021-02-28)
Hi Dreyk

For me personally, your narrative raises more questions than answers. I have a rational, logical mind (which could be argued is counter-intuitive for me to be interested in Spirits / ghosts / paranormal, ((or this site)) but there you have it) so I was hoping you could "flesh out" some aspects of your adventure?

Now I'm probably not alone here in wondering: Why on Earth would you and / or your girlfriend want to venture into an obviously derelict building, covered in graffiti etc? Were you not concerned about encountering squatters / degenerates or your (and your girlfriends') personal physical wellbeing in a building that is in the process of falling apart? What were you looking for that outweighed the obvious risks?

Your comment: "I've never experienced anything close to paranormal in the US. Not growing up, and not when I returned for a couple years recently. I don't consider myself "sensitive" and I think it's more a matter of this region of the world being so overwhelmingly spiritually charged that I see or feel anything at all."

Are you able please elaborate on your thoughts on this? Personally, I'm not sure Why Kazakhstan or it's surrounding areas be "overwhelmingly" spiritually charged as opposed to any other area on Earth where humans have existed? I have never heard of this theory before. Also, I would imagine that people who are sensitive to spirits would sense them everywhere, as the spirit world must be all around us and is not restricted by / limited to physical geography?

You also wrote "It was obvious that very few "tourists" or even European Russians passed through this crossing." According to many sources, since the "Borat" movie was released in 2006, tourism to Kazakhstan has increased 1000%. So I'm sure that the border guards would be quite used to tourists on that major road. Also the significant road you were on where you found the sanitarium leads to Kostanay (pop. 215, 000 in 2019 census), a reasonably large city in itself which also then leads to the capital city of Astana (pop, more than 1,000,000 people and which was renamed Nur-Sultan in 2019). This road would be well used, I would have thought?

Another aspect that doesn't make sense to me was the documents everywhere "Between the rows of cabinets, sat a dozen long tables with piles of old documents scattered all over." Now, to me, unless the inhabitants had to leave in a hurry (trust me I've seen what "leaving in a hurry" looks like after experiencing two catastrophic earthquakes here in Christchurch, NZ about 10 years ago) why on Earth would these documents be left behind? The Soviet Union is notorious for secrecy and oppression so unless the staff had to vacate urgently, why wouldn't they take all these, no doubt confidential / sensitive, files with them? Maybe you can't answer that but, to me, it seems odd.

If a building was so easy to access and had graffiti all over it, then I would have been surprised to see chairs still there, paintings on the wall, filing cabinets, desks, projector lights left behind etc... Surely these would have been looted a long time ago? Jeez... I dunno...

I'm sorry for so many questions but your writing is so good, the story has so much strong imagery/ detail and your mastery of English is so good that this story really drew me in and I became fascinated by it. Please keep them coming.

Regards

Mack
Seekings (1 stories) (10 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-02-28)
Thanks for your reply Dreyk. It's significant that these experiences only started with the move to the country that's now your home, so I think you're right to feel that its past history and cultural beliefs somehow resonate with the paranormal. Your description of the whole area as 'spiritually charged ' makes seems spot on!

I hope you have more stories to tell

Seekings
Dreyk (9 stories) (27 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-02-27)
[at] Seekings. I've never experienced anything close to paranormal in the US. Not growing up, and not when I returned for a couple years recently. I don't consider myself "sensitive" and I think it's more a matter of this region of the world being so overwhelmingly spiritually charged that I see or feel anything at all.

[at] The_Lost_Voyage_11. Based on the architecture of the building, very very traditional Romanesque typical of the Stalin era, Ludya and I placed it at around the mid 1930's in age. It, like most Sanitariums however stayed in full operation until the late 80's or early 90's when the Soviet Union fell. Although it was certainly intended to be a place of relaxation and recreation, safety standards were quite lax. A guest or staff member could easily have had something nasty befall them in or around that auditorium. Records would be incredibly hard to find.

Although the USSR took meticulous records, the former Soviet satellite countries, like Kazakhstan tended to just let those records rot. It's quite possible some of those documents which explained things were in the archives hall we found later in the visit, but most of that paperwork had turned to mulch years before...
Dreyk (9 stories) (27 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-02-27)
[at] Melda. The theater/auditorium's ceiling was approximately 15m tall (50ft) and the window was at about 12m (around 40ft) from the floor. The exterior dimensions for the theater were about the same as the interior, meaning the window wasn't higher up than about 12m from the ground outside. I'm sure there was at one point access provided to the window for cleaning and repairs.

Either a steel catwalk outside, or perhaps along the interior wall, but there were no real signs of it left by the time we were exploring. Anything iron or steel which could be easily removed was undoubtably stolen for scrap in the early 90s... As for describing the man himself? The best way I can describe it, would be a slightly out of focus image... Like someone just slightly moved the camera during exposure creating this form that was definitely a guy - but the features were not quite clear. Add in the distance and the fact that we were looking outside at a bright blue-sky environment from inside a dark room, it didn't help things...
The_Lost_Voyage_11 (2 stories) (87 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-02-27)
Hello Dreyk, and welcome back, I had read some of your other experiences but hadn't seen anything from you in a while. Thanks for sharing an amazing experience, certainly gave me chills and very well told! I could picture myself there experiencing it all. The figure standing at the window, seen by your girlfriend but unseen by you while you were standing near where 'he' should have been, very creepy, but validating too, that what you had seen was truly not of this world. I guess you got an answer regarding your question to the unseen entity regarding whether it wanted you there or not! Still I'm glad that's all 'it' did, it sounds like it could have been worse. It seems in its heyday to have been a pleasant place where people could relax and unwind, it's hard to imagine how such a force could have accrued there. Did you ever look into the history of the place to find out if anything had happened there that could explain what may have been 'residing' there that you encountered? Do you know how old this place was, or how long it had been in operation? Thanks again for a great read!
Seekings (1 stories) (10 posts)
+3
7 months ago (2021-02-27)
Hi Dreyk,

I've followed and enjoyed all your stories on here; you convey the sense of place and atmosphere so well through your writing, and convey the ' otherness' of your experiences without melodrama.

Did your brushes with the paranormal happen only after you moved to Russia, or were there any before, while you were still in the US? Or when you returned briefly to the US? Apologies if this has already been asked and answered, I'm genuinely interested in how the move seems to have acted as a catalyst to your encounters.

Seekings
Melda (10 stories) (1362 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2021-02-27)
Dreyk - You have certainly had some amazing experiences.

I might have been brave enough to wander around the outside of this sanatorium but to actually go inside? I don't think so. Those vibes must have hit you full on as soon as you approached the place 😨

I'm trying to wrap my mind around how you saw this man outside a broken window when there was no way that he could possibly have stood there. How far above the stage was the broken window and how far above ground level? Did you see the entire figure of this man (legs and all) or was he only partially visible, say from waist or shoulders up? Any way that he could have been standing on a structure (since long gone) and somehow met his death as a result of a fall, or some other unfortunate incident? I'm just trying to find a possible reason for his presence in that spot at some stage during his life.

Then you still go and visit a spooky registry room? You and Ludya are two very brave and determined people!

I really enjoy reading your experiences... Keep them coming.

Regards, Melda
Dreyk (9 stories) (27 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2021-02-26)
[at] Macknorton this would have been around May of 2012.

[at] MrsRamsay thanks for the compliment on my English. I was actually born in the US and moved to Siberia to start a career in radio. There's more information about that on my profile.

Glad people are enjoying my latest attempt at putting my experience to words...
MrsRamsay (10 stories) (210 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2021-02-26)
Great story, your English is excellent!
I thought your girlfriend was brave to have stood there inside alone as long as she did. Thanks for sharing.
Macknorton (5 stories) (646 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2021-02-25)
Hi Dreyk

Thanks for sharing this spooky adventure. May I ask when it took place?

Cheers

Mack
Rajine (14 stories) (265 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2021-02-24)
That sounds absolutely terrifying, whatever was there definitely didn't want your'll there and made it known.

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