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Jeju Island's Snake God

 

To describe it: It is about three times the size of the anaconda in the movie "Anaconda."

And, like a human, there are changes in facial expression.

When snake God appeared in my dreams, snake God appeared very soft and warm.

Snake God smiled very warmly.

And then, translucent, it appeared and sparkled.

It seemed like snake God knew something about me, and he was shaking his head up and down to show that he was happy to see me.

Literally, it is a "translucent and sparkled giant snake."

Anyway, I don't know if peace in the house was maintained thanks to the snake god's help.

However, one thing is certain.

I haven't been able to see ghosts since I became an adult. However, before adulthood, ghosts were clearly visible.

Among them, what I saw was a person's shadow moving in broad daylight.

There were no people, but human shadows moved of their own will on the street.

The shadow tried to break into my house.

However, the shadow kept bouncing off the entrance of our house, as if there was a movie-like (like doctor strange) barrier in place.

The shadow tried to break into my house countless times, but failed every time.

(There were about 5 attempts.)

After five attempts, the shadow seemed to have given up and disappeared into the nearby forest.

After that happened, I told to my grandmother.

Grandma said the snake god helped us.

My grandmother worshiped the snake god until she could not stand up and walk, until her body became weak.

After my grandmother passed away, it was no longer possible to offer very clean water to the snake god every morning.

We held a family meeting.

The issue decided at the family meeting was, "Grandma has passed away, so the snake god must now be sent to heaven."

My family called a shaman.

The shaman began a ritual to guide the snake god to heaven.

And, finally, the snake god spoke to my family. (Borrowing the shaman body)

Here is what the snake god says:

"I am the family guardian god.

There is a saying that if something is sweet, you eat it, if it is bitter, you spit it out.

You family are being very rude to me.

I have blocked countless evil spirits and bad energy from attacking this family."

Then there was silence for 10 minutes, and the shaman was shedding tears.

And then the snake god's last words followed again

"I'm very sad... I can't forget the past events I had with your family.

Now, that's the end."

Afterwards, the shaman returned to his original form.

The shaman said.

"The snake god ascended to heaven very sad.

And, to prevent anything bad from happening, he ascended to heaven, leaving behind the snake god's final blessing."

And the shaman's ritual ended.

And the next day, a sad, shabby-looking snake came out of the house and disappeared into the tangerine field.

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Comments about this paranormal experience

The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, kim0307b, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will read the comments and participate in the discussion.

The_Dark_Soul (5 stories) (17 posts)
 
3 months ago (2024-01-31)
My heart broke after reading the whole story. How bad the snake god must have felt leaving your house. I think it had developed a special bond with you guys.

A very sad story.
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2023-09-25)
RCRuskin //

Even in Korea, "snake worship" has not yet been properly studied.
Some scholars even claimed that it originated in India.

However, there are no exact facts.
Look at the history of the Korean Peninsula, its people were very record-crazy.

However, the area where I live was originally a country completely different from Korea.
I should say that it was annexed to Korea in very ancient times.

Most of the history of the area where I live has been lost since the Mongol invasion and ancient korean (Goryeo) VS jeju (Tamla),Mongol Union wars. (목호의 난)

In this process, there are, of course, religious stories passed down by "oral tradition."
However, not many people keep the story because so many people died due to the civil war between 1948 and 1954.

It's a sad reality.
RCRuskin (9 stories) (815 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2023-09-25)
So here I was, looking up something else entirely, something relating to the Greek Pantheon and I happened upon an interesting reference:

"Snake image: A lararium traditionally includes a representation of a snake, which represents the Agathos Daimon, the protector of pantry and food stores. A simple painting or good quality photo of a snake is fine."

Now I should probably check with the department of archeology or anthropology in the local university, but it is interesting to me that snakes as guardians of the home is a theme in at least two cultures.
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+3
7 months ago (2023-09-17)
lady-glow //

Personally, I find your story too hard to comment on, due to its highly religious content. Although on the one hand I respect all religions and the right of any and all individuals to believe in whatever they choose, on the other hand I wouldn't necessarily believe without question the basics of any religion.
Also, though I think and find the mythology of all religions fascinating, I don't take those stories like historic facts.

I understand that the giant snake is important in your set of beliefs, and pretty much compare it to the protection that praying to any saint from the catholic faith, or to Hanuman, or reciting verses of the Quran would provide to any believer of those faiths, but to non-believers this may seem... Hard to take.

I agree. There are many Koreans who do not believe this story at all.
Times have changed a lot, and people's perceptions have changed a lot.

Before that, many traditional religions were destroyed in Korea through the government power.
There is a clear positive side to the disappearance of many bad habits and bad religions.

In the process, there have been many cases where traditional korean religions that provide much support to people have disappeared along with them

I believe that when the "power of faith" disappears, god disappears along with it.
Even on Jeju Island, the "snake god" that families once believed in has been almost wiped out. It is safe to say that there is almost nothing as of 2023.

Someone said that change is the survival law.
However, I feel very bitter because that story seems to be a bit difficult for Korean traditional beliefs.
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2023-09-17)
lady-glow //

I know that at that time, the northern ancient Korea peoples like the people of Manchuria, believed in the "Tengri" faith.

Soybean paste was first made from soybeans by the ancient Korea northern peoples.

During the process of making soybean paste, the clear or black water that rises to the top is soy sauce.
Therefore Soybean paste and soy sauce are produced at the same time.

In ancient Korea, like other countries and peoples,
There was almost no Refrigeration facility.

So, I prayed hard that the soybean paste and soy sauce worked hard to make would not spoil or cause bugs.
Starting from this, Korea's unique and very powerful god of sauce would have been born.
(At that time, traditional Korean pickles often used soy sauce and soybean paste, Likewise, it falls under the management category of god of sauce.)

It is surprisingly not long ago that peppers were introduced to Korea. It was introduced to Korea from Japan around the 15th and 16th centuries.
At this time, red pepper paste was came into existence.

(After the 15th and 16th centuries, red pepper paste also came under the management category of god of sauce, It also includes salted vegetables and with the red seasoning kimchi that was created at this time.)
(* Therefore, if you break the jar containing this sauce, The God of Sauce are angry.)
(** God of Sauce also served as a medium to connect with high-ranking gods.)
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2023-09-17)
lady-glow //

Why didn't anyone else keep the tradition of worshipping the snake? Was it because, according to the previous link, "Jeju has a strong legacy of snake worship. A matrilineal tradition passed from mother to daughter".
And your grandmother was the last woman of her lineage?


My grandmother actually nominated my mother as her successor.

My grandmother considered my mother a very good successor. But...

My mother stopped believing in the snake god and suddenly started believing in a strange religion (*strange religion that deceives people and extorts money) and stopped worshiping the snake god.
My grandmother passed on all her knowledge to my mother, but my mother broke with the tradition herself.

And, family discord, father and mother separated.

The grandmother, who had passed on all her knowledge, was devastated.
My grandmother worshiped in place of my mother until she became so ill that she could no longer move.

After that, the knowledge was not passed on to anyone.
(It seems like my grandmother herself chose to end the family tradition.)
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2023-09-17)
lady-glow //

Did the shadow's bouncing cause any noise? If so, did any other member of your family hear it?
ㄴ The shadow was very quiet.

There was no sound when it was bounced, and the shadow's behavior seemed very confused.
After trying to break into the house several attempts, I gave up and disappeared into the forest.

Is this snake the same as in the following article?
Https://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html%3Fidxno=3154
ㄴ This is a very famous Jeju Island myth and religion.
Similar, but completely different.
For the snake god in my story, the rice jar or salt jar in the house is the god's house and temple.
(* There are jars ranging from as small as 5L to as large as 100L.)

The snake god in the link
Snake god with a "large shrine" and is a very powerful god.
This is the level of a guardian deity that protects the "village," not the home.
(There are trees that are hundreds of years old with yellow, green, blue, white, and red cloth wrapped around them, or strange-looking stones.)

A proper shaman even performs the ritual himself. (The shaman who mainly performs these rituals is called "ten thousand Spirits" [만신])
(* Kim-Geumhwa national ten thousand spirits, she was a very famous and respected person.)
lady-glow (16 stories) (3155 posts)
-1
7 months ago (2023-09-16)
Welcome to YGS.

From my perspective, the spirit world and spirit entities are the same worldwide, the only difference being the name they're known by people from different ethnicity/beliefs/countries/religions.

"I haven't been able to see ghosts since I became an adult. However, before adulthood, ghosts were clearly visible... The shadow tried to break into my house countless times, but failed every time."

I see certain symbolism in the previous facts. It is known that children tend to be more sensitive to the paranormal world, perhaps because they are not yet been biased against things that are not supposed to exist.
I imagine the shadow could have been able to walk through the wall or the door, but the fact that you didn't open the door for it was a way to 'tell' any other disembodied presences that they're not welcome into your life.

Did the shadow's bouncing cause any noise? If so, did any other member of your family hear it?

Is this snake the same as in the following article?

Https://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html%3Fidxno=3154

Why didn't anyone else keep the tradition of worshipping the snake? Was it because, according to the previous link, "Jeju has a strong legacy of snake worship.

A matrilineal tradition passed from mother to daughter".

And your grandmother was the last woman of her lineage?

When you say: "there are also very powerful gods, the gods of soy sauce, red pepper paste, and soybean paste."

All these food products are man made...wouldn't this mean that those "gods" were inexistent before these things were invented? Like in they were created by people's imagination?

Personally, I find your story too hard to comment on, due to its highly religious content. Although on the one hand I respect all religions and the right of any and all individuals to believe in whatever they choose, on the other hand I wouldn't necessarily believe without question the basics of any religion.
Also, though I think and find the mythology of all religions fascinating, I don't take those stories like historic facts.

I understand that the giant snake is important in your set of beliefs, and pretty much compare it to the protection that praying to any saint from the catholic faith, or to Hanuman, or reciting verses of the Quran would provide to any believer of those faiths, but to non-believers this may seem... Hard to take.

Thanks for sharing.
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+2
7 months ago (2023-09-16)
RCRuskin // In Korea, there are many forgotten gods.

Unusually, there are also very powerful gods, the gods of soy sauce, red pepper paste, and soybean paste.

The god who manages soybean paste, red pepper paste, and soy sauce is called "Cheolryungsin" (철륭신) in Korean.

He looks like a homeless person, wears a bizarre mask, and has long hair.

It can be expressed as either a woman or a man.

However, he rarely speaks and has a very stiff and cold image.
kim0307b (3 stories) (9 posts)
+4
7 months ago (2023-09-16)
RCRuskin/// In Korean call, chilseongsin (칠성신)

In my area, the guardian of the home is mainly a snake.

However, the power of this serpent god is so powerful that it tends to be worshiped as a god that protects the city itself.

In Korea, Chilseongsin (칠성신) is different from region

"Jeju Island" where I live is the appearance of a snake.

It's not even comparable to an anaconda movie.

It's huge.
RCRuskin (9 stories) (815 posts)
+3
7 months ago (2023-09-16)
This is a most intriguing story. I'm shivering, and not sure if that is because of the chill in my room or because of the spookiness of this story.

What is the name of this snake god?
Rajine (14 stories) (771 posts)
+3
7 months ago (2023-09-15)
Snakes mean different things to different cultures across the world, great story.

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