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Can A Painting Be Haunted? This Is Serious

 

Thankyou to everyone who read and liked my first story about my grandparents home.

This story intails a painting that my mother brought home from a auction when I was about 8.

As I have stated previously my parents imported and exported antiques and fine wines for many years. Now just antiques.

My mother Natasha is Russian born but grew up in the USA from the age 3, and always had the love of anything old and unusual when it came to furniture and artworks. Something that seems to have rubbed off on me a little.

My parents would regularly go to auctions and estate sales and the like to purchase interesting pieces for their Business. It was rare that anything purchased at these sales ever made it home to become part of our house unless it was out of the ordinary or my parents liked it too much to part with it.

My childhood home looked like a cross between a mad man's idea of a yard sale and a antiques market belonging to an insane hoarder. But it made for good fun and interesting conversation. And many a good fort.

None of the furniture or artworks previous had bothered me as far as I can remember until my mother purchased a painting by an unknown artist (it's never been signed and research has never uncovered who painted it or who the subject actually is). All we know is that the family who put it in the auction bought the home they had found it in and didn't like the painting or several pieces of furniture that the last owners had left behind. So off to the sales they went. It was a rather large lot of over 50 items. My mother purchased the painting and a sideboard full of silverware and plates of varying ages locked inside (we got them open after we got it home. It was strange as my mother had been told it was empty. Not so much as it turned out.).

The painting is of a women of about 30 years old (maybe older but it's hard to tell) wearing a long blue-grey gown standing in a veranda of an old house. Next to her is a table with a tea set and kettle and what looks like some cake or sandwiches on a plate. There are some flowers and a chair and part of a window. Whoever did the painting had a lot of talent as the detail is incredible. It was probably painted around 1900-1910. Judging by the fashion she's wearing.

My mother brought it home and we hung it in the hallway next to my parent's bedroom between the main bathroom and a little room my dad used to do his paperwork in.

I felt very strange around the painting from the first day it was hanging up. The hallway in summer was comfortable and not too warm but after the painting was hung up the area around the painting turned almost ice cold. Passing the painting I'd get goose bumps on whatever exposed skin I had.

I also started feeling like the lady in the painting was watching me. My twin sisters started saying that they didn't like looking at the painting as it made them feel uncomfortable and like they weren't meant to be around it. My baby brother would walk on the other side of the hallway to it. And when asked why he'd say he didn't like the lady and that he was cold when he looked at her (he was 5 at the time nearly 6).

Soon it went past just feelings in the hallway. At night we'd start hearing whispers that hadn't been there previous. Our house already had its share of spooky behaviour we had got used to but this was new.

Movement of a flash of blue-grey like the dress out of the corner of your eye. A strange touch occasionally in the hallway when no one else was around. This may sound like something from Tales From the Crypt but I assure you this isn't something I saw on tv. I only wished sometimes it was.

After my father (6'5", 350 pounds of him) got a cold hand run up his back when he was in the shower was any real notice of what we all had said to our parents. Used to other ghosts in the house we at first thought oh it's just another spirit making itself known to us as its new here.

But then things got bad. Fast.

- My baby brother (let's call him Adam) was tripped on the stairs and pushed by a cold hand when he tried to get up again.

- The big fern we had in the hall next to the painting suddenly started dying. It was over 20 years old and had no previous problems. When moved away from the painting it went back to being fine. It's still alive today but one side of it looks a little mangled (the side facing the painting never was the same. The branches grew back weird like something had infected them. It was checked out and tested by plant specialist and they couldn't find anything wrong with the old plant).

- Our dogs Frankie and Dex (both terrier mixes) wouldn't go past the painting without whining or growling at it. They were normally very placid and gentle dogs. Our aunt's dog Lula (a poodle) had to be carried past it when we used to babysit her she wouldn't walk past it or even look at it.

- Our cats tried to claw at it one time when it fell of its hook onto the ground. Our normally placid Maine coon cats Sally and Meg both went nuts trying to scratch it until we took it away.

- It started coming off the hook every night and sat against the wall upright every morning when no one touched it.

My mother a very spiritual person who put up with our friendly spirits in the house with a grain of salt as they didn't bother her decided that this painting had to go and something was wrong with it. To which we all agreed.

So off to the auctions it went. Several times. My mother who knew the buyers found out they only kept it a month (they too heard whispers and their cat also attacked the painting) and gave it to a neighbour who liked it. The neighbour sold it on after her dog freaked out around it.

It kept getting sold on or auctioned or given away until 2014 when a man who collected art in Florida bought the painting and did not know of its history. Having again tried to research it's past. He only found out it was possibly a painting of an artist's wife who died young. I don't know if it's true of not. There is no real record of the artwork anywhere and it's not signed. The man who owned it last I heard keeps it in his basement, as it frightened his grandchildren. He says he won't sell it on and keeps it locked up. I think too he knows something isn't right with it. I'm worried as he's old what's going to happen when he dies.

This painting I think isn't safe. Either a ghost is in it or attached to it and it's not friendly. So please anyone of you see this painting let me know, it really should be destroyed.

I know it probably sounds like a made up story for kids. And a adult man like myself shouldn't be weary of a old oil painting of someone Unknown.

This painting is dangerous. Please destroy it if you buy it. It's really not worth the trouble.

I'm sorry it's a long story. I wasn't going to post it until I talked to Adam about the painting last night and it still scares him. And he loved exploring abandoned places and doesn't get frightened.

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Comments about this paranormal experience

The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, InTheTARDIS, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will participate in the discussion and I need help with what I have experienced.

LuciaJacinta (5 stories) (181 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-26)
Please excuse all of those mistakes! I'm so sorry. My phone is possessed I think. Forgive me guys.

I think you get what I was trying to say though.

I googled about haunted paintings and after reading stories of a few of them, my chest felt like it was being crushed. I wonder if anyone else experienced this?

Op if you went through stress over your painting as well, I understand. Good thing it's gone.
LuciaJacinta (5 stories) (181 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-26)
Hello your story is very interesting. I found my topic quite intriguing so I Googled about haunted paintings as well I think it was melted that initially had mentioned that. And after I had been reading on that for a while and looking at particular paintings peculiarly I felt a strange crushing sensation in my chest. I clicked off of the screen but I believe if you Google 10 most haunted paintings on eBay that the same paintings will show up. Perhaps it was just as self-induce phenomenon but it makes me wonder. As for you and your painting I have no real idea as to why it happened to be haunted the signature thing doesn't phase me as much as much as it may other people. I don't think that's important what's important to me is why the painter or someone cause this painting to be haunted. It's really an interesting topic and I wonder how common it is.
Manafon1 (5 stories) (617 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-25)
Hi InTheTardis--Thinking about it further, the artwork in question might have been painted by an itinerant folk artist. Folk artists who traveled from town to town to paint portraits were common throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century in America. These artists had no formal training and were self taught.

Most importantly these artists rarely, and in many cases, never signed their works. It was thought of more as a trade, the artist simply trying to render a reasonable representation of their sitter and they often didn't feel the need to sign them. There were a few folk artists, like Grandma Moses, who became famous but the vast majority were anonymous.

Of course, the painting your family had might have been done by a traveling folk artist who took advantage of his nomadic existence to carry out crimes against the local citizens. If that was the case he (or she) could have imbued the painting with the negative energy it seemed to possess.
AugustaM (4 stories) (835 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-24)
Between story and comments, my thoughts have drifted towards an impression of obsession. The hunch I get is that whoever painted this image wasn't the nicest of individuals. I am thinking he was obsessed with the subject and creating this painstakingly detailed image was his way of possessing her. Thereby he would have never intended on anyone else possessing that piece but him and when he passed, he remained attached to it - enraged by the very notion of anyone else owning or gazing upon it.

Probably just a bunch of nonsense but that is what my thoughts kept insisting.
Haven (14 stories) (232 posts)
+1
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
Hi Sebastian,

This is going to sound very out there but I read somewhere (I don't remember where) that people use to believe that souls could get caught in portraits. It sounds very Hollywood movie-ish but what if the person in the portrait was cursed and somehow was trapped in the painting? I'm sure if that was the case the painter would not want to sign his name.
InTheTARDIS (2 stories) (14 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
Melda,
True. Never really thought of that. Maybe it's a self portrait of a kind. Many artists as you probably know did self portraits. Or it could be a sister, a cousin or even a lover of the artist. Maybe he or she didn't want people to know who painted it. I was thinking back in those days it was seen as very bad if you had an extra marital affair or had a mistress. Or in case of the artist being a woman a lesbian lover that she didn't want anyone knowing about their closeness. Maybe that could have brought on the bad energy of the painting. Risidual energy of the artist and the sitter could have clung to the artwork like what often happens to old jewellery and things like beds and personal items often retain their old owners energy. Who knows any things possible right? It wouldn't suprise me at all.

For the other messengers,
Thankyou for letting me know you have painting that are unsigned but you know who the artists are your very lucky. We had the painting black lighted and examined by the best Avaidable when my parents bought it at auction. I found out from my mother that they were indeed originally going to put in their shop but because it wasn't signed and being from around 1900 - 1910 they couldn't trace the artist. Also they liked the interesting looking painting they ended up keeping it themselves for a time. Only getting rid of it when like I said in the story we just couldn't handle it being in the house anymore.
It was a strange artwork but very much of its time. And very well designed. I wish I could find out more of the artist or the lady who sat for the portrait. And why the hell the painting has such a nasty feeling that makes everyone one around it feel so freaked out.

Thanks for your thoughts. Makes me want to know more.
Sebastian
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
+1
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
InTheTARDIS - One can speculate forever on the lack of a signature. This is something we will never know.

My daughter now does graphic design. I'm sure you know that to be good at any form of art isn't enough, you have to be excellent to be truly successful. She now does graphic design, so is using her talent in a different way.

Interesting what your art teacher had to say. When I'm peed off with something I make I'm inclined to turf it. So if he didn't like his painting, he would probably have destroyed it. Simply my take on it.

Just as a by the way, I've been assuming all along that the artist was a man. Perhaps it was a woman?

But where does the answer to the haunting lie 😕

Regards, Melda
Manafon1 (5 stories) (617 posts)
+4
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
InTheTardis--Forgot to mention in my prior comment that some artists sign their works with highly stylized initials or a cartouche that can actually be incorporated into the work itself and can be very difficult to detect. Although you can no longer check, maybe the artist did this with the painting in question.
Manafon1 (5 stories) (617 posts)
+4
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
Hi InTheTardis--It does seem that the painting described in your account could be a haunted object. I did, however, want to comment on the lack of a signature on it. I have been collecting artwork for many years and although the vast majority are signed, some aren't. I purchased a painting titled "Remnants" at an art fair directly from artist Tatjana Versaggi that was unsigned. She signs her works as often as not.

Purchased another painting in Arizona titled "Early Winter on Oak Creek" by Judi Yescalis that is unsigned. The artist in this case did, however, inscribe the title on the back. Some artists are just eccentric with signing their artwork. The lack of a signature on the piece you describe could just be another example of such an artist. Either way, that painting does seem to have some sort of attachment.
InTheTARDIS (2 stories) (14 posts)
+3
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
Hey there Melda,
Your insites bring up more things to think about. When I was studying art in High School as we did I talked the painting over with my fantastic art teacher I had for 3 years running, all the kids loved her. Her name was Ms. Angela Spencer (everyone called her Ms. Angie). She too thought it was extreamlly odd that the painting had no artists mark or signing. And she'd gone to FALNY (Federal Arts League of New York) one of Americas top Artist and Performers. And she said she had never seen a finished painting without a signature. When she talked about it with Art friends one man said that the artist who did the painting must have really not liked it when it was done or was really p&&I'd off at it to not sign it.
Strange but apparently it used to happen sometimes back in those days If artists didn't like what they did. It also ment that the artist never wanted the painting to be seen by the public let know sold on to someone. I didn't think about it until this morning and had almost forgot the talk I'd had with my teacher. Maybe that explains at least in part why the painting is so upsetting. Ah who knows, artists can be a very temperamental lot.

It's so good to hear about your daughter. I hope she keeps up and works hard at her talent. She sounds like she has some real ability. Keep encouraging her that's all I can say. My parents kept encouraging me and I'm so glad they did. Doing this as a hobby helps my mind wind down after a crazy day at work. And really settles everything. It's better than going out and drinking or watching rather boring tv I think so anyway.
And thanks for your support of my hobby too. I'm sure you have something special you can do even if it isn't art. Everyone has something special about them. Find what it is and go for it.

Thanks for the great help and encouagement. And I'll put up some more stories for you and everyone else who's asking so nicely soon as I get a chance.
2 weeks holiday starting this Friday. I should be able to get some of my experiences up for all to enjoy at least I hope they will.

😘
Sebastian
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
 
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
InTheTARDIS - Interesting that you think the painting might have been rejected and therefore the artist's name didn't appear. I suppose that's possible but don't even students attach their names to their art? My daughter studied fine arts at university (inherited her father's talents, I can't even draw a stick man) and her signature was on all her work.

Enjoy your hobbies! I admire people who are artistically creative. Something which has sadly eluded me but that doesn't mean I don't appreciate the artistic creations of others.

I look forward to reading more submissions from you in the future.

Regards, Melda
InTheTARDIS (2 stories) (14 posts)
+4
6 months ago (2018-10-23)
Hello there Melda,
I'm greatful for your ideas. Your lucky you have a talented artistic husband. It's wonderful that he has done some lovely pictures of you.
I dabble a bit at art and although I'm no VanGough I still try to enjoy what I'm doing and it helps relax me when I'm stressed out from crazy work load.
I too have always put my signature on all of my works even the little sketches I've made. So I agree like you say it is extreamlly odd that this artist hasn't done anything not even their initials.
We have also opened the back of the frame to see if he/she had signed or named the picture there as some artists did it on the front and the back especially if the said painting was ment for sale. I know this from my parents having bought many old paintings for their imports and exports shop. This has only one thing on the back. A Red Cross like artists do when they reject the Peice. Unless maybe it was an art school Peice that didn't pass the grade.
We did as much research on this and sadly as I said in the story nothing came up. Pity really as I think despite the painting causing freak outs as it did. The painting is rather beautifully well done and has so much detail it almost looked like a high resolution photo on some lights.
I'd still not have it back anywhere I lived full time. Whatever is attached to that painting isn't ever going to be nice. And we did try to be nice to it. But it seemed to only make it more upset.
I have a lot of old paintings in my home now as like my parents I have a thing about antiques and one of my hobbies is to restore them (I did a proper certificated class for this all four certificates) And I'm facinated by how these beautiful furniture etc is made. I'll take old stylish antiques any day over new boring things that is for sure. They just have a special energy about them.
Maybe the person who painted the haunted painting didn't like what he/she did and didn't sign it as he/she didn't want to have it attached to him or her. Pity really.

Well at least I'll have more interesting stories for you and everyone else to read soon. I hope you enjoy them.

Much appreciated;
Sebastian ❤
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
+1
6 months ago (2018-10-22)
InTheTARDIS - Thanks for responding to all the comments.

I have to admit I find the story of this painting fascinating. My husband is a rather good artist (only a hobby) and he used to do a lot of sketching but he always signed his name, even on a pencil sketch he did of me when I was about 19 years old! I've known a few people over the years who have sketched and painted and they have never failed to sign their names - probably because they take pride in what they have created.

It makes me wonder, perhaps a clandestine love? I now have to admit that although I have a very logical head on my shoulders I do tend to be a bit of a romanticist. (Oxymoron 😕)

Regards, Melda
InTheTARDIS (2 stories) (14 posts)
+3
6 months ago (2018-10-22)
Hello Everyone,
Thankyou for your helpful and again wonderful reply's. Many of you again have come forward with some great ideas and I will check them out.
I do love scary movies but I haven't seen "Occulus' but I think I will check it out as it sounds interesting.
Wow, I never knew that about the MONA LISA painting either although I do enjoy old artworks (van Gough being my favourite) . That would also seriously make me nervous.

Sadly I don't have any photos of the painting as I was only 8 when we had it. I asked my mother today just in case she or dad may have taken any photos of it. Sadly neither of them have a photo of it and the auction catalog from where they got it has long since been thrown away. Pity I reallly wish I had a picture of it to show you.
As someone else here said it is very weird that it wasn't ever signed. My parents thought so too. Maybe the artist didn't originally want it sold on and for it to only be in their home. Still it's very strange.

I can't contact the current owner sadly also as I don't know his name only that he keeps it locked up safe in his basement after weird occourances with his grandchildren. He dosent want it sold on. I wish I could buy it back just to destroy it. It's really not safe I think something whoever or whatever is attached to the painting is dangerous.

Anyway, Thankyou for your wonderful help. If you have any more questions or ideas please let me know.

Sebastian.
Twilight1011 (6 stories) (241 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-21)
Your experience with this painting is very interesting. What came to mind upon the question of whether or not a painting can be haunted, it made me think about what I heard of a picture being taken of someone. That when someone takes a picture of someone, it's been said that it can capture a piece of this person. I'm not sure on the truth to this, but it's just what came to mind on your painting. So it makes me wonder on the possibilities of a painting of someone. Could that too somehow capture a piece of the one it's of? I do not know, but it does make you wonder. As far as my opinion goes on it though, I can believe that an attachment could happen with a painting. Especially if it was a loved painting, that meant a great deal to someone. I've heard a lot of different stories from people that have been haunted, so knowing how there's so many different types of hauntings that have happened to people all over the world, I don't believe one on a painting sounds too far fetched. Thank you for sharing your experience with us, and like some others mentioned, it would be nice if you do have a picture to show us of this painting, as it would be very interesting to see 😊
Bibliothecarius (7 stories) (866 posts)
+4
6 months ago (2018-10-21)
Greetings, TARDIS.

I'll start with a side-note: I don't know if you care for scary movies or not, but there are interesting elements in the film "Oculus" (2013) about an antique mirror & people's perceptions of it.

There are traditions/superstitions of mirrors needing to be covered when a death occurs, thus preventing the soul from getting lost/trapped on its way to the afterlife. There are far fewer accounts of haunted paintings (the "Crying Boy" of the 1980s, etc.), haunted objects, etc., BUT those narratives exist. My grandad brought home a beautifully-carved bust of a woman's head, and I could tell when he'd moved it into a different room *before* I saw where she was. (If you're interested, more details in the story and conversation: "Grandad's Carved Bust" story=22452.)

The peculiar aspect of haunted objects, I find, is that no-one necessarily has determined with any accuracy who would haunt what, or why. At the Stanley Hotel, Mrs. Stanley can be heard playing the piano some afternoons because she did that while she was alive; I suspect that the music would continue even if the piano were moved to a different room, but that's just a guess. Some past owners seem to consider themselves to be the rightful owners of their most prized possessions, while others seem to be interested in how the new owners take care of their items.

There isn't exactly a database for "haunted items" beyond Frank Zaffis's museum in Connecticut, as far as I know, but I've not looked for one. Sometimes, the haunting entity seems to have no connection with the object's source, use, etc., and at other times there's a clear indication of the creator's --or original owner's-- reasons for staying with the item.

I've sometimes wondered if Leonardo da Vinci ever shows up in the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa ("La Gioconda" in Italian, "La Joconde" in French). He refused to sell it to the King of France because it was too personal a painting; eventually the King paid Leonardo for the painting on the condition that the painting be brought to him when Leonardo died; that's why it is in France, now.

Sorry this is a slightly rambling response, as I take forever to wake up on Sunday mornings; I hope I've given you some reassurances that you're not alone in this phenomenon.

Best,
Biblio.
RCRuskin (8 stories) (523 posts)
+3
6 months ago (2018-10-20)
I would really like to see a photo of this painting, if it is possible. Oh well.:)
CuriousDee (8 stories) (630 posts)
+2
6 months ago (2018-10-20)
InTheTARDIS,

Interesting account. Honestly, I'm on the fence as far as believing objects can be haunted or have an attachment. Probably because I haven't encountered it. That and the 'Hollywood portrayal'. Your experience does give me food for thought.

Do you have a photo of the painting to share here? If not, would you be able to do some research to find its likeness at the very least? I'd be interested in seeing it anyway.

Thanks for sharing 😊
Dee
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
+1
6 months ago (2018-10-20)
InTheTARDIS - Many objects are haunted, such as antique furniture, jewelry and, I have no doubt, paintings as well.

I would love to know whether this particular painting was haunted by the artist or by the woman in the painting. It's strange that the painting was not signed by the artist. I wonder why? It creates the impression that it was intentionally left unsigned for a very good reason, perhaps even ominous 🤔 One's imagination could run wild!

I googled "haunted paintings" - perhaps you did as well. There are some really interesting articles.

Thanks for sharing this intriguing story!

Regards, Melda
InTheTARDIS (2 stories) (14 posts)
+1
6 months ago (2018-10-20)
Thankyou Your Ghost Stories for publishing my second story. I'm very greatful.

Sebastian.

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