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Dad's Paranormal Experience

 

Namsate readers, I am new to this site. The incident that I am going to narrate happened with my Dad, around 30-35 years back. It happened during his childhood. My Dad now lives in Mumabai but he spent his childhood in our native place Jaunpur, Uttar Pradesh. Being the only son of my grandparents, he was very mischievous. As per my Grandma, he used to be full of energy everytime, always running places, playing with his friends and exploring different places and so on.

My father was very fond of mangoes and so was summer season his favorite. Everytime when an "aandhi" (mild storm) would come, he would take a sack and run to pick mangoes (mangoes that fell from tree due to blowing winds) from the "baghicha" (here,mango garden) with his friends, no matter whether it's daytime or night. At one night, around 2:00-3:00 a.m,there came an "aandhi" (mild storm) and my dad as usual ran to pick up mangoes. As he was collecting mangoes and filling his sack, he heard sounds of mangoes falling from nearby tree. And this tree was known for it's special type of mangoes. My dad was overjoyed and he started approaching towards that tree. As he was going, he stopped and then he remembered that this tree had no mangoes this year (Usually,not every year mangoes tree bear mangoes, sometimes they don't). He was terrified, he felt like waking up from a nightmare. He threw his mango sack and ran like hell from the baghicha.

I still don't understand what was it? Was some evil spirit trying to lure my Dad? And what if my Dad had approach that tree? Sorry for the length of my story and please don't mind my grammatical mistakes, if any!

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The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, _Shiva_Singh_, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will participate in the discussion and I need help with what I have experienced.

sushantkar (16 stories) (521 posts)
+2
8 months ago (2018-09-20)
Augusta, that is quite research you did to find auspiciousness of Mango tree which is very significant so hats off to you.
And I also agree that it may contain some massage.
However, it was your dad's experience and a long time has passed, I don't think that there would be any significance of asking any questions regard his experience now.

Regards
AugustaM (4 stories) (841 posts)
+5
8 months ago (2018-09-20)
I have noticed that the mango tree pops up quite frequently in stories by contributers from India. For example:

Https://www.yourghoststories.com/real-ghost-story.php?story=21125

Https://www.yourghoststories.com/real-ghost-story.php?story=22518

Https://www.yourghoststories.com/real-ghost-story.php?story=18019

Granted, as the mango is India's official fruit and 1,000s of varieties of them are grown there - it would seem as though that frequency well could be because there appears to be one such tree on every corner (...my idea of heaven)!

However, it always seemed to my reading as though the mango tree held more significance to the stories than that. My initial impression was that the mango tree seemed to hold some sort of negative cultural aura as the stories shared to this forum seem so often to feature a fearsome entity manifesting in on or beneath one and contain a sense of desired avoidance of such trees. But it seems I could not have been further from the truth. After a bit of research, I came to find that the mango tree is considered quite auspicious in most parts of India with relatively few exceptions!

If you will forgive the length of the entry, I will share an excerpt from an e-book that I found to be so fascinating on the topic:
The mango tree is considered sacred both by the Hindus and the Buddhists. Lord Buddha was once presented with a grove of mango trees under which he used to repose and since then the Buddhists consider the tree holy. According to a Burmese legend, a gardener presented Buddha with a large mango fruit. The fruit was cut and prepared by his favourite disciple Ananda, for Buddha to eat. Afterwards Buddha handed the stone-of the fruit to Ananda to plant it in a suitable place. When Ananda had planted the stone as directed, Buddha washed his hands over it and suddenly a beautiful white mango tree sprang from it bearing flowers and fruits. This story is represented in a sculpture at Bharhut.
Hindus consider the plant of great religious significance. They consider the plant as a transformation of the god Prajapati, Lord of all creation. Therefore, on all religious and sacred days, Hindus use its twigs as tooth brushes and its leaves as spoons for pouring libations,
Villagers in India believe that the mango tree puts forth fresh green leaves at the birth of a son. So a tradition is being perpetuated and mango leaves are festooned across the doorways of a house where a son is born. The plant being considered auspicious, its leaves are also hung over the doorways of a house where marriage ceremonies are performed, perhaps in the hope that [he young married couple would beget a son.
The- origin of the tree is seeped in mythology. The daughter of Surya deva, the Sun God was being persecuted by an enchantress. She threw herself into a pond and changed into a lotus flower to escape-the evil designs of the enchantress. A certain king saw the flower and desired to possess it. But before the king could take possession of it, the enchantress burnt it and from the ashes of the lotus arose the mango tree. The king saw the tree ladden with the mango fruit and decided to keep the fruit with him. When the fruit ripened and fell to the earth, from it came out the daughter of the Sun God, whom the king recognised as having been his wife in an earlier birth.
In aboriginal India, the bride and the bridegroom have to circumvent a tree before the marriage ceremony can be performed. For this purpose the bride smears the Mahua (Bassia latifolia) tree with vermilion, walks round it and then embraces it. The bridegroom performs a similar ceremony with the mango tree.
According to an Oriyan tale, the tree was created by the Kittung from the thigh bone of a goat sacrificed to him, a bone left behind accidently by the worshipper. The tree is also associated with the Kinchesum, a god accepting human sacrifice in the tribal world of India. It is also a favourite tree for people committing suicide by hanging. The Gadaba and Kond tribes associate the mango with the human testicles as the seed of the fruit resembles them. According to a Bonda story, death came to the world through the mango. Gadaba and Bondo mourners at a funeral have to step over the mango bark before they can return home. Gadabas also use mango branches in a prophylactic rite to avert disease from a village. Practically all the tribes in India observe a Mango fruit festival, before which it is taboo to eat the fruit.
The wood of the tree being sacred, it is included in the funeral pyres as well as in the sacred ceremony of Homa. The flowers of Mango are dedicated to the moon to whom they are offered on the second day of Magh (Feb-March), and also to Madan, the god of love.
The mango tree in Brahmasaras is in the's'hape of Brahma. He who waters it will lead the Prtrs to salvation.
During his separation from Parvati, Siva sat under an Amra tree and through the grace of Lalita was ultimately married to Parvati when he went to mount Kailash.
(Gupta, Shakti M. Http://vidyaonline.org/dl/shaktigupta.pdf, 53-55)

So perhaps what the OP's father experienced was meant to be a message of some sort. Did anything significant happen in his life or to his family in the days relatively soon thereafter?
_Shiva_Singh_ (guest)
+2
8 months ago (2018-09-19)
As per him, he heard the repeated thumping sounds (mangoes falling) from that tree. So the idea of dead branch falling rules out. I feel it could have been some paranormal spell to lure my Dad or something else.
Amor (5 stories) (60 posts)
+2
8 months ago (2018-09-19)
After doing all 'energetic' things, he got scared of a sound from a mango tree that does not bear fruit that season. Well, mangoes attract a lot, not just kids who are fond of mangoes. Bats and other animals who would love fruits and, yes, bats. Plus, since there is storm, it could be a dead branch. Hope nothing bad happened.:) Thanks for sharing your dad's love of mangoes. 😊 Given the 'evidence' maybe our guess is as good as yours.:)

Cheers,

Amor
BeautInside (3 stories) (317 posts)
+3
8 months ago (2018-09-19)
Hi Shiva,

I agree with Melda and Apo, the sound could have come from somewhere else. Did your father see anything strange that could lead him thinking there might had been something out of the ordinary?

Superior, thank you for your stepping in. 😊 That could back up Shiva's dad fear, but if he got scared just because of the sound that could have been just mangoes falling from another tree. Or even something else. Shiva doesn't mention her/his dad seeing anything...
the_superior (3 stories) (17 posts)
+3
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
[at] _Shiva_Singh_
As per my ancestors beliefs, there is a type of ghost that stays on a tree and throws trunks on people who are passing by. These spirits are known as "Gira" (spirit of an unmarried guy). Gira can be either docile or harmful depending on the type of person it was.
Not sure if your dad encounter the same thing though.
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
+1
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
Apo - I've decided to not even look at my profile page for the next few weeks. The troll can take as many votes as it requires to satisfy its greedy little ego, or it can just shove them where the sun don't shine 😁

I rather like the sound of troll hunting for loonies, or even loonies hunting for troll.

Regards, Melda
Aporetic (5 stories) (125 posts)
 
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
Hahaha I meant "Ghost Hunting With Loonies" - sorry. I know that's what I typed - I've been 'trolloped' LOL
Aporetic (5 stories) (125 posts)
+2
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
Melda, one of those mangoes fell on my vote LOL I think we need 'A Troll Hunting FOR Loonies'.

Shiva, that probably won't make sense to you. It refers to a story by a prominent YGS members 'Troll Hunting With Loonies' and the trolls who down vote comments, just because. If you come across them, don't fear. We have an anti-troll police squad who more than make up for those silly trolls:p
Aporetic (5 stories) (125 posts)
+2
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
Greetings, Shiva

I was also wondering that "he heard sounds of mangoes falling from nearby tree." I thought I missed something in your narrative, and read it a second time, but you do not mention him seeing them fall as "he started approaching towards that tree."

Considering the time, if your dad did not SEE the mangoes falling, the sound could have come from elsewhere, as the slightest noise is much louder at that hour. Perhaps you can check with your dad?

Regards
Apo
Melda (9 stories) (1112 posts)
+1
8 months ago (2018-09-18)
Shiva - Welcome to YGS.

Well if there weren't any mangoes on the tree then he couldn't possibly have heard mangoes falling from it. He must have heard something else. What? I have absolutely no idea.

I'm not intentionally being unhelpful but I can't try to conjure up something paranormal about this. Perhaps you are omitting some vital information? Did he see mangoes falling from the tree that didn't bear any fruit that year?

Regards, Melda

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