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Battle At Greasy Grass Aka Little Big Horn

 

I was traveling to Billings, Montana from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, to catch a flight. I had been camping and hiking solo for 3 weeks at this point and didn't realize I was going to drive past the Battle of the Greasy Grass, otherwise known as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

It was just over an hour before the gates closed and I didn't need to be in Billings until the next evening, so I decided to stop in before looking for a campground closer to Billings. I walked around the graveyard and thought, "wow, this is it." I then went to the visitors center and was told I could drive down a long road to view the places where battles happened and that there would markers where native people and calvary men were buried.

I still had about 45 minutes so I took off in my rental to the first overlook. As I walked up, I had my head down looking at the ground, stepped up off of the curb and onto the overlook before looking out onto the beautiful rolling hills. But what I see is a battle happening right in front of me.

Native people on foot, calvary on horseback and on foot. Both had guns but natives also had bows. It startled me and I shook my head, similar to a wet dog, and it all disappeared. I thought whoa what the heck was that, but then just forgot about it as I checked out the markers and looked out over the hills. I've come to realize that things happen to me and I don't take it all too seriously.

I got back in the rental to go to the next overlook. I had my head down until I reached the overlook and I saw another battle happening, not the same as the first, and then it just dissipated in a matter of a minute or so. I had time to go to one more overlook before they closed the gates and the same thing happened.

So I'm really intrigued now and find a place to camp nearby so that I can return.

I waiting at the gates before they opened. I continued to go to all of the 12 overlooks and saw different battles at each one.

I still had a little time before I needed to head to Billings so I decided to walk the little nature trail behind the visitor center.

I love to photograph snakes (especially rattlers) and wildflower, among other creatures in our natural world. So I take the walk looking for rattlers and photographing wildflowers.

As I walk down the path, it was as if I hit a brick wall that was not there. I could not walk further and I thought, "there are dead people everywhere." But then I looked around and did not see any markers so I said to myself that I was just being foolish and then continued the walk.

When I got to the end of the trail there was a kiosk that said that the deadliest of all battles was fought here and there are bodies everywhere. Because of the terrain they were not excavated.

I have not had an opportunity to return but I would like to one day to see if this happens again and take better note of the battles.

I often have experiences on native land and spoke to an elder about this who said that I am supposed to share these experiences about native people to kind of close a gap of understanding between natives and others. This occurred in 2007.

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Comments about this paranormal experience

The following comments are submitted by users of this site and are not official positions by yourghoststories.com. Please read our guidelines and the previous posts before posting. The author, naturestacey, has the following expectation about your feedback: I will participate in the discussion and I need help with what I have experienced.

AugustaM (4 stories) (792 posts)
+3
3 months ago (2018-11-01)
I too am puzzled as to why this was posted a second time. Its a darn good story but... I understand losing one's password and needing to create a new account but not why that would necessitate a second posting of an old account. Its odd that it seems somewhat paraphrased in places rather than wholesale cut and pasted.

The whole episode seemed fairly elaborate at first blush - I can completely accept seeing the battle from an overlook and the sensing of the bodies underfoot but the continued viewing of the battle (s) from multiple overlooks and the level of detail gathered from such quick visions are quite something. Perhaps the OP truly does have very highly tuned psychic abilities but I will confess to being a bit on the fence, perhaps encouraged by the "Groundhog Day" situation.
Rex-T (4 stories) (235 posts)
+2
3 months ago (2018-11-01)
Hi all,

I do think that it is premature to draw any conclusions as to naturestacey's intentions.

This has the hallmarks of somebody who has lost access to their original account and has been forced to create a new one. It has happened to YGS members in the past and, who knows, it may happen to you one day.

If this is the case, there are arguments for and against.

The Fourth comment (28/10/18) in the original story indicates that naturehiker and naturestacey are the same poster. There is also naturestacey's 28/10/18 comment on "3 Visits To Canyon De Chelley" that adds weight to this scenario.

The fact that this happened close to Halloween and no explanation in naturestacey's profile is concerning.

Guess we'll have to wait for an answer.

Rex-T
CuriousDee (8 stories) (630 posts)
+3
3 months ago (2018-11-01)
Thanks to Armor for the link, I thought I had already read this account. Isn't this the exact same story, with a different title and username? The other story is 'Battle At Little Bighorn'.

Did the author resubmit this story under a different name and title? 😕
matrix899 (1 stories) (49 posts)
+2
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Haven,

This battle was not the end of the Indian wars, there were many more battles to come. The battle of Little-bighorn was just one battle in the story of the Indian wars, and we know how that ended.
matrix899 (1 stories) (49 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Haven,

As a follow up, if the 700 troops had not been split into 400 and 300 there may have been a different outcome to the battle. I am not a military tactician, but it seems to me that Custer's plan was a good one; he had used these tactics before. The problem here, was the group of 400 cavalry never joined in the attack.

I don't know what would have happened if the 700 had attacked all at once, as mentioned, I seems to me that Custer's tactics was a good one.

This battle, and the outcome, was thoroughly studied by the US army of the time, so the events are well documented by the US army.
Haven (12 stories) (199 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Matrix899 -

I guess it just depends at how you look at it. I'm sure the other side would argue that a tragedy was prevented because the second group of Cavalry did not attack. I see it as a tragedy no matter who won this battle. The odds were against the Calvary when you look at the numbers but I supposed when taken by surprise the odds were against the Natives.

Thanks for replying and for the additional information to Naturestacey's story.
matrix899 (1 stories) (49 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Haven,

This is in response to your question.

The tragedy I referred to in my comments, is the death of General Custer and his 300 men. They were all killed.

Of course in wartime we expect that people will die whenever there is combat, and it is a tragedy when anyone dies; but the tragedy I referred to in my comments is the death of Custer and his men.
RCRuskin (8 stories) (494 posts)
+2
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
[at] Amor, I knew I read this narrative before! When I first looked at it, I didn't have time to look through the archives.
Haven (12 stories) (199 posts)
+2
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Matrix899 -

Something is bothering me about your comment. "The plan was to catch the Indians in a crossfire, but the second group of Cavalry never attacked. This is what contributed to the tragedy". Please tell me I'm misunderstanding this, but the way I'm reading it seems like to you it was a tragedy because there were not more cavalry to attack the natives and therefore it resulted in more Calvary losses. So, if all 700 men had attacked it wouldn't have been a tragedy?

I'm sure I'm reading it wrong, can you explain what you mean?
Haven (12 stories) (199 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Naturestacey,

Wow, what an incredible experience. I believe you have a gift and agree that you were given this gift to share with everyone the "other" side of the story. It's like seeing things in the native's perspective. I would love to read about your other experiences.

Thank you so much for sharing.
Amor (5 stories) (60 posts)
+2
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Oh yes, it was you. There was a comment by you in this account 3 days ago. Sorry I just checked the comments now.

Cheers,

Amor
Amor (5 stories) (60 posts)
+6
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
Hi NatureStacey!

Are you by any chance NatureHiker before?

Because I believe a post similar to this one was published last July. And I liked it. If it was you, thank you for coming back to share 😊

Here is the link:
Https://www.yourghoststories.com/real-ghost-story.php?story=25894
matrix899 (1 stories) (49 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
I guess I published my comments too quickly.

The Indians were initially surprised, but collected themselves during the course of the battle when some of them did get mounted and counter-attacked. One such group was led by Crazy horse.
matrix899 (1 stories) (49 posts)
+1
3 months ago (2018-10-31)
An amazing experience.

I have read similar accounts before and do believe that such experiences happen to some people.

I can understand being surprised and shocked when it happens the first time, so you probably did not try to take in details; nevertheless, your observations that the Indians were on foot while some of the Calvary were on horses seems to conform to what we know about the battle.

The Cavalry, led by Custer with his detachment of 700 men, was split into two groups of 400 and 300 as part of the attack plan; they were attacking a village of roughly 10,000; Custer was leading the group of 300, the second group of 400 cavalry was ordered to attack after Custer's group of 300 had engaged the Indians. The plan was to catch the Indians in a crossfire, but the second group of Cavalry never attacked. This is what contributed to the tragedy.

This was a surprise attack, so the Indians would not have had time to get their horses, they would have all been on foot.

Your observation that some of the Indians had guns while others had bows is also in keeping with historical facts.

Thanks for documenting and sharing your experience.

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